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Thread: of or off?

  1. #11
    mxreader is offline Member
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    You can find millions of examples of non-standard English on the internet.
    Millions of native English speakers speaking non-standard English?
    Please check the source of the first example.

  2. #12
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by mxreader View Post
    Millions of native English speakers speaking non-standard English?
    Please check the source of the first example.
    That source states that it is informal.

  3. #13
    mxreader is offline Member
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Sure, but I still hear native English speakers use similar constructions here in Australia.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by mxreader View Post
    Sure, but I still hear native English speakers use similar constructions here in Australia.
    Yes, I'm sure you do. However, it's not the sort of English that we teach to students.

  5. #15
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Good point. What do you think of "wanna" and "gonna"?

    BTW I do teach about informal constructions in conversational English. ESL students do need to recognise them after all.
    Last edited by mxreader; 06-Mar-2012 at 09:36.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by mxreader View Post
    Good point. What do you think of "wanna" and "gonna"?

    BTW I do teach about informal constructions in conversational English. ESL students do need to recognise them after all.
    People say "wanna" and "gonna". I think the important thing is to teach learners that they will hear them but they should try to use correct English when speaking and never use them in writing.

  7. #17
    Finicky is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    You ought to be aware that neither of these expressions is standard English....
    get grief informal to be criticized angrily I got a load of grief off Esther because I was ten minutes late.

    Source: Cambridge Dictionary Online (grief)

  8. #18
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by Finicky View Post
    get grief informal to be criticized angrily I got a load of grief off Esther because I was ten minutes late.

    Source: Cambridge Dictionary Online (grief)
    As I said earlier in this thread, that source states that its informal.

  9. #19
    BobSmith is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Good grief!

  10. #20
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    Default Re: of or off?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    People say "wanna" and "gonna". I think the important thing is to teach learners that they will hear them but they should try to use correct English when speaking and never use them in writing.
    I agree with you when you say they should never use such expressions in writing, but I don't think there's anything wrong if a student of English as a Foreign Language said:

    I got that habit off a friend of mine.
    I got stick off my dad for coming in late.

    I'd be chuffed if one day a student of mine came up in class with an informal statement like those above. It would probably mean they had a chance to use English with their friends outside a formal learning environment.
    Last edited by shannico; 06-Mar-2012 at 12:56.

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