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Thread: care

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by FW
    I think you have made a good point about the difference between "care about his smoking" and "care if he smokes". But I think "care FOR his smoking" means something else altogether. Doesn't it mean "I don't like his smoking"?

    "I don't care for his smoking" (I don't like this act.)

    care for = don't like
    his smoking = this act

    'his smoking' functions as a gerund, a verbal noun, which means to say that grammatically it acts as a noun, a thing, a habit, but semantically it denotes an act, 'smoking'. It is in that way that 'care for his smoking' refers to both the act and the habit.

    :D

  2. #12
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    Got it (I think). But this brings up another question for me:
    Would you say there is a difference between:

    1-I don't like the children fighting.
    2-I don't like the children's fighting.
    3-I don't like the children to fight.

  3. #13
    RonBee's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FW
    Got it (I think). But this brings up another question for me:
    Would you say there is a difference between:

    1-I don't like the children fighting.
    2-I don't like the children's fighting.
    3-I don't like the children to fight.
    They all mean the same to me. I do think the first and third are more likely to be used.

    :)

  4. #14
    Tdol is online now Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by FW
    Got it (I think). But this brings up another question for me:
    Would you say there is a difference between:

    1-I don't like the children fighting.
    2-I don't like the children's fighting.
    3-I don't like the children to fight.
    1&2 are basically the same- the second is a more formal version. The third suggests a more restricted meaning to me. I'd use it if the children only fought occasionally or under certain conditions.

  5. #15
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    1-I don't like the children fighting. (don't like X doing this) gerund
    2-I don't like the children's fighting. (don't like this) noun
    3-I don't like the children to fight. (don't like X to do) verb

    :D

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