Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15
  1. #1
    Chico3576's Avatar
    Chico3576 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Hello... I'm a new member here and I find this possibility of clearing up our doubts on the English language with an experienced teacher or a native speaker of the language extremely cool.
    Well, let's get down to business then. I've been studying some idioms recently with the word "jam" and I got a little unsure along the way as to weather the sentences I created with those idioms are correct.
    The idioms are these: "jam tomorrow" and "money for jam."

    Just one thing I'd like to make very clear. These doubts have nothing to do with any kind of homework or the like. I'm an English teacher for young children, not a native speaker and on my free time I study English on my own, with the help from books, dictionaries and web sites like this one solely, as I must keep improving my English skills in order to pass some English tests I want to take in the future.


    These are the sentences I created: I'm tired of these promises of jam tomorrow she makes.
    Politicians are very fond of promises of jam tomorrow.
    This talk of moving to Europe is all just jam tomorrow.
    Her job provides her with money for jam.
    He would like to find a money for jam kind of job.
    Working for a congressman is money for jam.


    Thank you very much in advance for your kind attention and time spent on giving me a helping hand. I trully appreciated it. Greetings from Brazil
    Chico

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,672
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by Chico3576 View Post
    Hello... I'm a new member here and I find this possibility of clearing up our doubts on the English language with an experienced teacher or a native speaker of the language extremely cool.
    Well, let's get down to business then. I've been studying some idioms recently with the word "jam" and I got a little unsure along the way as to weather the sentences I created with those idioms are correct.
    The idioms are these: "jam tomorrow" and "money for jam."

    Just one thing I'd like to make very clear. These doubts have nothing to do with any kind of homework or the like. I'm an English teacher for young children, not a native speaker and on my free time I study English on my own, with the help from books, dictionaries and web sites like this one solely, as I must keep improving my English skills in order to pass some English tests I want to take in the future.


    These are the sentences I created: I'm tired of these promises of jam tomorrow she makes.
    Politicians are very fond of promises of jam tomorrow.
    This talk of moving to Europe is all just jam tomorrow.
    Her job provides her with money for jam.
    He would like to find a money for jam kind of job.
    Working for a congressman is money for jam.


    Thank you very much in advance for your kind attention and time spent on giving me a helping hand. I trully appreciated it. Greetings from Brazil
    Chico
    I'm tired of these promises of jam tomorrow she makes.
    Politicians are very fond of promises of jam tomorrow.
    In these two, the phrase is correctly used but the sentences are not very natural. Here are a couple of suggestions:
    "I'm tired of listening to her promises of jam tomorrow." (Imagine she is the Prime Minister/President.)
    "Politicians are always promising jam tomorrow."
    If a job is "money for jam", it's very easy and very well paid .

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,851
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    be money for jam - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Neither of those are American idioms. I'd never heard of them.

    Her job provides her with money for jam.

    This seems kind of literal.

  4. #4
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,672
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    be money for jam - Idioms - by the Free Dictionary, Thesaurus and Encyclopedia.

    Neither of those are American idioms. I'd never heard of them.



    This seems kind of literal.
    For an American I suppose it would have to be "money for jelly" and "jelly tomorrow".

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,851
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    No, we have both jellies and jams here. But we don't equate them with grand promises or a cushy job.

  6. #6
    BobSmith is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    902
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I'm tired of these promises of jam tomorrow she makes.
    [AmE - not a teacher]

    Wow, none of these make any sense at all! I thought I was going crazy there for a second.

  7. #7
    Tullia's Avatar
    Tullia is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    They're both common enough here in the UK, although perhaps a little oldfashioned nowadays. "Jam tomorrow" represents a promise of something in the future to sweeten the idea of something less pleasant *now*, but the understanding is that the "jam" is extremely unlikely ever to arrive.

    It apparently gained popularity as a phrase after being used by Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, (see Jam tomorrow - encyclopedia article about Jam tomorrow.) and I too was taught it in school as a way to remember the Latin nunc/iam difference, but honestly I don't know if Carroll coined it or simply popularized it.

    Another way of saying "money for jam" that the AmE users might be more familiar with is "money for old rope".

  8. #8
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    9,851
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by Tullia View Post
    They're both common enough here in the UK, although perhaps a little oldfashioned nowadays. "Jam tomorrow" represents a promise of something in the future to sweeten the idea of something less pleasant *now*, but the understanding is that the "jam" is extremely unlikely ever to arrive.

    It apparently gained popularity as a phrase after being used by Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass, (see Jam tomorrow - encyclopedia article about Jam tomorrow.) and I too was taught it in school as a way to remember the Latin nunc/iam difference, but honestly I don't know if Carroll coined it or simply popularized it.

    Another way of saying "money for jam" that the AmE users might be more familiar with is "money for old rope".
    Don't know that one either. Do know "money for nothing, chicks for free."

  9. #9
    Tullia's Avatar
    Tullia is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Don't know that one either. Do know "money for nothing, chicks for free."
    And that's one I haven't heard of! This is an interesting thread :)

  10. #10
    Chico3576's Avatar
    Chico3576 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Doubts on how to use a couple of idioms with the word "jam".

    Quote Originally Posted by BobSmith View Post
    [AmE - not a teacher]

    Wow, none of these make any sense at all! I thought I was going crazy there for a second.
    Well, seems like these are idioms originated and used in the UK only. I found them in the entry for "jam" in my Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary and the dictionary makes no mention whether they are used in the US as well. I thought that they were common in the US too, as they were coined from the book Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There, ​by Lewis Carrol.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] "The couple hope that" or "The couple hopes that"??
    By pinbong in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2010, 09:07
  2. Doubts and doubts: idioms, uses of verbs and nouns etc.
    By Interventizio in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-Jul-2010, 12:35
  3. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Nov-2007, 11:26
  4. "break the jam" vs. "break the ice"
    By nyggus in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2006, 04:08
  5. Is it "a couple decides" or "a couple decide"?
    By sandrapinkoski in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 24-Jan-2006, 20:19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •