Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    improver is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    20
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    Would you mind telling me that the saying of fourteen forty-five and the saying of a thousand four-hundred and forty is 1440 are both correct or not?

    And I would like to know how to use " By the way" and "At the same time"
    Actually, The phrase of "by the way" is not suitable for writing a formal article,right?

    Thanks for attention

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,147
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    Quote Originally Posted by improver View Post
    Would you mind telling me that the saying of fourteen forty-five and the saying of a thousand four-hundred and forty is 1440 are both correct or not?

    And I would like to know how to use " By the way" and "At the same time"
    Actually, The phrase of "by the way" is not suitable for writing a formal article,right?

    Thanks for attention
    Please ask your second question about by the way/at the same time in another thread. After you create the new thread, you can come back and edit your first post to delete it. When your questions are completely unrelated, please don't ask them in the same post.

    If you are talking about the year 1445, it will sound very odd to most native speakers if you don't say "fourteen forty-five" or fourteen-hundred forty-five.

    If you are talking about a quantity, then you can say either fourteen forty-five, or fourteen hundred and forty-five, or one thousand, four hundred and forty-five.

    We would not say "a thousand" but "one thousand."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    paysage57 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    Just an additional question: can you leave out the "and" when you are talking about a quantity?

    "1445: one thousand four hundred forty-five"

  4. #4
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,147
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    Yes, in the US, but I prefer it with the "and." It's easier to undertsand that you're at the end of the number.

    Four hundred and forty-five == Tell ms clearly it's 445.
    Four hundred forty-five == I wonder if you're about to add "thousand, six hundred and nineteen" or something like that.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. #5
    paysage57 is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • France
      • Current Location:
      • France
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    34
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    Thank you.

    So if my understanding is correct "and" is used only at the end of the number?

    For example 543,319,897 shall read:

    1) five hundred forty-three million, three hundred nineteen thousand, eight hundred and ninety-seven

    instead of

    2) five hundred and forty-three million, three hundred and nineteen thousand, eight hundred and ninety-seven

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,147
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Would you mind telling me the difference of these sentences?

    You'll hear both. I prefer 1.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Mar-2012, 05:43
  2. put my mind at rest, give a break to my mind
    By arzgol in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 19-Aug-2011, 16:24
  3. Difference between mind and heart
    By paris 06 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Dec-2010, 07:01
  4. [General] in turn/keep in mind/bear in mind/hedge/a veiled admission
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2010, 03:16
  5. come to mind VS spring to mind VS leap to mind
    By majid72 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Feb-2009, 22:30

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •