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    Mehrgan's Avatar
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    'split up' or 'break up'?

    Hi all,
    I hope someone will kindly help me find the right phrasal verb. What's the most commonly used verb/expression used when two close friends (of the same sex) stop their relationship after arguing over something?
    (Say, a 9-year-old kid gets home telling her mum grumpily he'd an arguement with Adney and that he'd decided to ............. (with?!) him (Adney)!)






    Thanks!

  2. #2
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Re: 'split up' or 'break up'?

    I hope someone will kindly help me find the right phrasal verb. What's the most commonly used verb/expression used when two close friends (of the same sex) stop their relationship after arguing over something?
    (Say, a 9-year-old kid gets home telling her mum grumpily he'd an arguement with Adney and that he'd decided to ............. (with?!) him (Adney)!)


    When only two people are involved, "split up" and "break up" are commonly used in the case of romantic relationships of some sort, or in business or on a project where you might split up or break up a partnership, for example. Or they might "go their separate ways".
    An argument can also cause a friendship to "break down" or "fall apart".

    In the case of a couple of kids he/she is more likely to say:
    "I had an argument with Adney and we aren't friends now".. or "..we don't like each other anymore".
    An older person might say:
    "I had an argument with Henry and it looks like our friendship's over".
    "I had an argument with Henry so we're really not on good terms now".
    "I had an argument with Henry and we're not even on speaking terms these days".
    "I used to get on well with Henry but I can't be bothered with him anymore".
    "I had an argument with Henry and so that seems to be it for our friendship".
    .. other relevant phrases:
    "I seem to be in Mary's bad books".
    "I seem to be on the outer with David".
    "Stephanie won't even give me the time of day".
    .. and of course many others.

    not a teacher

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: 'split up' or 'break up'?

    If two children at school are particularly disruptive when they sit together in class, the teacher might say "OK, I've had enough. I'm going to split you two up now". The teacher would then make sure those two children sit at opposite sides of the class so that they can't cause trouble together.

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