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    #1

    "standby" vs "ready"

    Which is better? or both correct??

    1) When the unit is stanby, please press the start button.

    2) When the unit is ready, please press the start button.


    Thank you for your help in advance!

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    Quote Originally Posted by shiho0165 View Post
    Which is better? or both correct??

    1) When the unit is in standby, please press the start button.

    2) When the unit is ready, please press the start button.


    Thank you for your help in advance!
    You can use either, if the term have been defined. If there is a pilot light labelled as "standby" or "ready", and that light is one, you can press the start button.
    Which is better would depend on the type of machine, the nature of the process, etc.

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    #3

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    Actutually this is the third time to write you! Your comment is simple and easy to understand. Thank you so much.
    See you soon : )

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    #4

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    They're different to me- when something is ready, it is fully operational, but when it is in standby, it is not ready but can be operational very quickly.

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    #5

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    I would definitely use "ready" in this case.

    "Standby" is used, in my experience, when you have one unit (say, a pump) working and you have another unit "on standby" ready to take over automatically should the first unit fail.

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    #6

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    This is from a list of instructions. In any halfway sensible list of instructions this line wouldn't occur until 'ready' or 'standby' had already been defined for that system.

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    #7

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    Everyone, thank you for you discussion. I think i will take "ready" this time. But what abou the care of mobile phone's "standby screen?

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    #8

    Re: "standby" vs "ready"

    If I understand correctly, a mobile phone or other device in "standby" means it is almost off. It is in a low power state, but not completely off, which would cause a long time to get booted up again. Electronics manufacturers have taken to more honestly labeling such as "standby" rather than "off."

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