Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    light87 is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • French
      • Home Country:
      • Algeria
      • Current Location:
      • Algeria
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    86
    Post Thanks / Like

    Talking ask for information

    Hi all teachers.In this definition "In phonetics, an R-colored or rhotic vowel (also called a vocalic R or a rhotacized vowel) is a vowel that is modified in a way that results in a lowering in frequency of the third formant.".I don't understand why R is vowel? and what is the meaning of third formant.Thank you.

  2. #2
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,098
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: ask for information

    The answer to your question depends on what you mean by R. The sound /r/ is not a vowel and neither is /ɹ/, which is the R-like sound present in most English accents. However, in Northern American English for example, there is also the R-colored schwa /ɚ/. This is a vowel, or at least some phoneticians consider it one. I'm not a phonetician and I can't honestly say I know why some sounds are considered consonants and other vowels, so I can't make this any clearer.

    As for the third formant and formants in general, I don't know what your acoustics knowledge is. I will assume no knowledge here.

    When you pluck a string of a guitar, it starts vibrating at many frequencies at the same time. These frequencies are called partials and a sound with more than one partial is called complex. Most sounds you hear are complex. In particular, the speech sounds are always complex with many partials. It turns out that a human brain uses only a few of them to distinguish between speech sounds. These partials are called formants. The third formant of a sound it the third lowest.

  3. #3
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    5,098
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: ask for information

    Also, have you read this post by Barb_D?

  4. #4
    raindoctor is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Swahili
      • Home Country:
      • Kenya
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: ask for information

    It is called a vowel, because the articulators don't touch. This is a crude description, since one can distinguish sounds based on the distance between articulators: stop (full obstruction) > fricative (slit) > approximant ( more open than the slit) > vowel. Your native r could be a tap or a trill, hence a consonant, since the articulators touch. It is not the case in many native English dialects; in some native dialects, r is produced as a tap.

    R-colored vowels and r consonant in AmE are different in timing. Otherwise, both are same. Even in American lects, this r produced in two different ways: bunched (molar) r; retroflexed (curled0 r.

    For more, check Geoff's post

Similar Threads

  1. the sensor information OR the sensors information
    By ironman2008 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Mar-2012, 03:15
  2. [General] new products information / new product information?
    By phoenixqn81 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-May-2011, 10:54
  3. Difference bet Information on and information about
    By debdulaldey in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Aug-2009, 07:25
  4. ask for information
    By adel87 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 10-Aug-2009, 07:21
  5. hello want to have some information
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 16-Feb-2008, 05:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •