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Thread: off

  1. #1
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Dear teachers,

    Please read the following sentence:

    When they first arived arrived in New York they lived in a lane off Broadway for half a year.

    I don't quite understand the word "off". Does the sentence mean they lived in a lane next to Broadway? If it is so can I use "next' instead of "off"? Or does it mean there are lanes between the lane they lived and Broadway? If it is correct then how many lanes in between?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  2. #2
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    Default Re: off

    Jiang, off broadway means the street stems off broadway, and normally means it is a cross street(perpendicular, or similar). It is probably better to say off Broadway, if this is the case, as if you just say "next to" people may think that the street is parallel, on the other side of the block..

    Hope my explanation makes sense.

    Cheers
    Last edited by juiceofzeus; 01-Dec-2005 at 08:49.

  3. #3
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: off


    Dear juiceofzeus,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see.
    May I say Broadway is like the trunk of a tree and the lane off it is like branches and along the broadway there might be many lanes off it?

    Jiang




    Quote Originally Posted by juiceofzeus
    Jiang, off broadway means the street stems off broadway, and normally means it is a cross street(perpendicular, or similar). It is probably better to say off Broadway, if this is the case, as if you just say "next to" people may think that the street is parallel, on the other side of the block..

    Hope my explanation makes sense.

    Cheers

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    Default Re: off

    poetic yes yes you could say that

    cheers

  5. #5
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: off


    What does this "poetic yes" mean?

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by juiceofzeus
    poetic yes yes you could say that

    cheers

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    Default Re: off

    my bad, I should type in full sentences. I just meant to say that your comparison was poetic

  7. #7
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: off


    Now I see. Sorry. My reading comprehension is too poor.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by juiceofzeus
    my bad, I should type in full sentences. I just meant to say that your comparison was poetic

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    Default Re: off

    Additionally, "off", as in, not located on Broadway Street.

  9. #9
    jiang is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: off


    Dear Cas,

    I thought I understood the word perfectly when I received juiceofzeus reply. But now I get confused again. It seems your explanation is not the same as that of juiceofzeus's. I am afraid it is beyond me.

    Could you please further explain the difference between the two?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Additionally, "off", as in, not located on Broadway Street.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: off

    To echo the above answer, off Broadway suggests near to, but not actually on, Broadway; just as the Titanic sank off the coast of Canada.

    In the New York theatre listings, there used to be lists of 'off Broadway' productions, usually less mainstream theatres than the big, wealthy broadway theatres, which would have new and unknown plays in theatres near Broadway. Then the lists included 'off-off Broadway' plays, meaning absolutely nowhere near Broadway.

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