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  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: Taste of persimmon

    [tangent]
    Moonlike - others too, maybe - may be interested to know that the word for 'peach' in many Romance languages - pÍche (Fr), pesca (It), pÍssego (Pg), but not Spanish [melocotůn - which prefers the image of a furry apple] - is derived from an abbreviation of the Latin for 'Persian apple'.
    [/tangent]
    [backOnTopic]
    I prefer 'tart' to 'astringent' in this context. 'Tart' (as an adjective) is always about taste, whereas 'astringent' is less specific; for example shaving lotions are often astringent.
    [/backOnTopic]

    b

  2. #12
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Taste of persimmon

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    [tangent]
    Moonlike - others too, maybe - may be interested to know that the word for 'peach' in many Romance languages - pÍche (Fr), pesca (It), pÍssego (Pg), but not Spanish [melocotůn - which prefers the image of a furry apple] - is derived from an abbreviation of the Latin for 'Persian apple'.
    [/tangent]
    [backOnTopic]
    I prefer 'tart' to 'astringent' in this context. 'Tart' (as an adjective) is always about taste, whereas 'astringent' is less specific; for example shaving lotions are often astringent.
    [/backOnTopic]

    b
    I agree about "tart" and "astringent". Astringent makes me think of things like witch hazel, toner and other toiletries. I've never used it to describe taste.

  3. #13
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    moonlike is offline Member
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    Default Re: Taste of persimmon

    Hi
    Sorry, I think a misunderstanding happened, I couldn't find that clear meaning (which clearly defines the taste) in OALD, CALD or LAAD. I found these meanings for astringent:
    Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary: severe, describes something that acts as an astringent (astringent: a drug or cream that causes the skin or other tissue to tighten so that the flow of blood or other liquids stops).
    Longaman Advanced American Dictionary: 1. criticizing someone very severely. 2.able to make your skin less oily or stop a wound from bleeding 3. having an acid taste like a lemon. (it doesn't exactly clarify it dries the tissues, makes a contraction and draw together the tissues)
    Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary: (the third meaning) of a taste or smell, slightly bitter but fresh.
    I think the ones that I found and mentioned before clarifies this meaning better.
    Could you kindly help me and tell me if it can be a good word to refer to the taste of an unripe persimmon? Does it sound natural to you as an English native speaker?
    Thanks a billion.

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Taste of persimmon

    As I don't think I have ever tasted a ripe persimmon, let alone an unripe one, I can only repeat what I said in my previous post - astringent is not a word I have ever used to describe the taste of anything (and I don't think I've heard it used in that context).

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Taste of persimmon

    astringent, chalky, bitter and foul
    though tastes differ of course

    Persimmon
    Judging the Ripeness of Persimmons
    Last edited by Esgaleth; 18-Apr-2012 at 09:30.

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