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  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by magimagicE View Post
    I think words borrowed from religious writings might be apt: heretic, zealot, Judas etc.

    Other words that I can think of which might help to form the specific idiom that you are looking for include: black sheep, fanatic, radical.
    The OP asked about a "person who is strictly protesting, opposing to some kind of issue or idea, has been disregarded at utmost by the community". Such a person might be a zealot, fanatic or radical, but none of these words has any idea of his being disregarded, The other words are too loaded with their own meaning to be applicable here.

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    #12

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by magimagicE View Post
    I think words borrowed from religious writings might be apt: heretic, zealot, Judas etc.

    Other words that I can think of which might help to form the specific idiom that you are looking for include: black sheep, fanatic, radical.

    ....
    As it happens, Tdol's suggestion is biblical (although the Free Dictionary doesn't mention either Isaiah or John 1:23, and the word 'crying' is crucial to the Biblical quote - and people who use a plain 'voice in the wilderness' probably aren't aware of this).

    And isn't 'black sheep' biblical - or is that 'lost'?

    b

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    As it happens, Tdol's suggestion is biblical
    And there was I thinking it originated with Sir Cliff.

    A Voice In The Wilderness - Cliff Richard & The Shadows - YouTube


    ps. It's 'lost sheep'.

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    #14

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lingustic View Post
    thanks for helping, but that doesn't involve any insulting to the opposing person,

    he/she should be treated with utmost disregard and humuliation, neglecting the fact, that whteher his/her idea is useful or not.

    Regards,
    I was thinking of prophet is not without honour save in his own country since the question was about idioms. True, the underlying idea of being insulted and disregarded by the community depends on how well the audience are familiar with the historical background of this idiom. The same could be applied to Tdol's 'a voice in the wilderness'. Apparently, the crucial point about the two idioms is that they both imply the ideas expressed by this person are true, good and useful. In case they are not, Bob's 'lunatic fringe' might seem the closest, but doesn't it primarily mean that the person disregards/violates the norms of the society? Since the idiomatic language is the language of attitudes, could there be the same words/idioms for opposing notions?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    As I said earlier to Linguist, "You seem to be assuming that English has a word for this. It may have - I can't think of one - but it may not."

    Eleven posts later, nobody has come up with one yet. It seems to me that Tdol's 'voice in the wilderness' and Esgaleth's 'prophet without honour' come closest.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    And re 'lunatic fringe', perhaps I don't need to point out that it doesn't occur just when the moon is full...

    b

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    #17

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    Quote Originally Posted by Esgaleth View Post
    Since the idiomatic language is the language of attitudes, could there be the same words/idioms for opposing notions?
    My thoughts exactly.

    Another biblical one. (Not an idiom in English as far as I know.) Says Jeremiah:

    Woe is me, my mother, that thou hast borne me a man of strife and a man of contention to the whole earth! I have neither lent on usury, nor men have lent to me on usury; yet every one of them doth curse me.

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    #18

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    How about 'completely ignored tinfoil hats?'

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    #19

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    If I'm getting the point correctly, I can suggest a few more:

    Cynic, pessimist .... Gloomy Gus (lol) ... wet blanket, party-pooper .... naysayer... skeptic, scoffer, disparager .....

    In an alternative light; outcast (n), pariah ... leper... Scrooge??


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    #20

    Re: Negligibility expressing idiom in English?

    (Not a Teacher)

    'Pariah' may be the closest word for this. It is an outsider who is held in disdain by a society or community. It doesn't give any indication as to the reason for it, though.

    You could say something like:
    "He is a scientific pariah."
    That indicates his ideas are not accepted by the scientific community, perhaps even scoffed at.

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