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  1. moonlike's Avatar
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    #1

    "I'm due to see myself in London." Is this sentence natural?

    Hi
    Would you mind helping me? Due to means something is expected or arranged. For example, she is due to pass the exam, it means she's expected (others expect her so). Can we use due to if the expectancy comes from inside? I mean you expect yourself to do something like the example in the thread? I mean "I expect myself to try hard and to e in London the next month." Is it natural to you?
    Thanks a million.

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    #2

    Re: "I'm due to see myself in London." Is this sentence natural?

    No.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: "I'm due to see myself in London." Is this sentence natural?

    And "due to pass the exam" isn't natural either.

    She is due to arrive at 6 p.m.
    There is not arrangement that she'll pass.

    You can say "She is due for her annual pay raise" or "I'm due for some vacation" or "He's due for some good luck after all that's happened to him recently." In that case, it means something is owed to someone (even it it's owed by the fates or the universe).
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. moonlike's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "I'm due to see myself in London." Is this sentence natural?

    [QUOTE=Barb_D;877650]And "due to pass the exam" isn't natural either.

    Thanks Barb. How about this sentence "The NSBRI is due to presents its findings...", doesn't it mean "the NSBRI is expected to..."?
    You mean "to be due to do something" doesn't mean "to be expected"? at all and we use it to talk about arrangement or when as you said something is owed to someone?
    Thanks a million.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "I'm due to see myself in London." Is this sentence natural?

    Yes, that's okay. It's in the same category as "She's due to arrive at 5 p.m."

    "The NSBRI is scheduled to" is the same meaning.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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