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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    The apparent magic

    Does this "apparent" mean "obvious" or "seeming"? I think it's "seeming". Does the meaning vary depending on context when "apparent" is a modifier before a noun?

    st177
    ex) Some runners come to realize their creative potential while running. This is when running becomes art...Then, running, unlike any other activity, becomes a means toward solving problems and curing depression...This usually occurs only when the runner is relaxed and doesn't carry any great expectations into the run. The apparent magic that running sometimes provides occurs almost inevitably as a surprise.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: The apparent magic

    When used directly before a noun, 'apparent' rarely means 'obvious'.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: The apparent magic

    Thanks a lot! Considering the whole context, the meaning seems "seeming= from what I've heard or seen", but the translation goes "obvious". This question's workbook was written as a preparation material for university entrance exam, and the part was translated by Korean English professors or experts, but I feel the limitation of their translation. That's why I always depend on native speakers or great teachers like you.

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    #4

    Re: The apparent magic

    Considering the whole context, the meaning seems "seeming= from what I've heard or seen", but the translation goes "obvious".


    In this context I don't think "apparent" means "seeming" in that sense.
    It's more that the beneficial effects of running seem to be a kind of magic, they have the appearance of magic.
    So here "apparent" means something like "ostensible", "by outward appearances".

    Some examples of "apparent" meaning "obvious":
    "She changed her mind about going to the dance, for no apparent reason".
    "The police said there was no apparent cause of death".


    not a teacher
    Last edited by JMurray; 27-Apr-2012 at 12:11.

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