Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    2,047
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default sacked from (his job)

    The following is from a local newspaper.

    Singaraja was placed under arrest and as he appeared intoxicated, he was sent for a blood test. It revealed a blood alcoholism level of 114 mg per 100 ml. He was sacked from his job.

    Are the words in bold needed? I guess they are not necessary.

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 27-Apr-2012 at 17:24. Reason: change typo error of 'test'

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: sacked from (his job)

    They are necessary if you wish to convey the message that he was sacked. Being arrested for drunk driving does not lead to automatic dismissal in many jobs.

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,756
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: sacked from (his job)

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    The following is from a local newspaper.

    Singaraja was placed under arrest and, as he appeared intoxicated, he was sent for a blood test. It revealed a blood alcoholism level of 114 mg per 100 ml. He was sacked from his job.

    Are the words in bold needed? I guess they are not necessary.

    Thanks.
    The words in bold are "from his job". Those, in my opinion, are redundant. "To be sacked" means "to be dismissed from your employment/job" so I don't think you need both. I would probably join the last two parts of the piece together though, to avoid a very terse final sentence: "It revealed a blood alcohol level of 114mg per 100ml and, as a result, he was sacked.

    Note that it's the "blood alcohol level/limit" not "alcoholism", which is an illness.

    There is another definition of "to be sacked" but it refers to the sport of American Football (gridiron), and I don't think there's any danger of a reader thinking that was the result of being over the blood alcohol limit.

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: sacked from (his job)

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The words in bold are "from his job". Those, in my opinion, are redundant.
    You are right. Sorry - I misread the question.

  5. #5
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    15,269
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: sacked from (his job)

    Somehow, I like from his job left in. It makes it clear that it was his day job he was sacked from and not from his position as his church's temperance counsellor or the old folks' minibus driver.

    It would have been better if the sentence had read 'He lost his job' or 'His employer sacked him'.

    Rover

Similar Threads

  1. [Essay] SACKED LETTER
    By omowunmi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-Feb-2010, 10:19
  2. [Grammar] job posting or job postings
    By uktous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2009, 14:00
  3. land a new job, or launch a new job?
    By engstar in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Nov-2009, 14:02
  4. my previous job & my last job
    By peppy_man in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-Oct-2007, 15:47
  5. steady job or stable job
    By Englishlanguage in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Oct-2007, 13:28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •