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  1. #1
    anhnha's Avatar
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    Default The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Hi all,
    I am learning English and having some problems with pronunciation.
    Would you show me the difference between 2 ways of pronunciation:
    The first is /faiv/
    The second is /faivə/
    or anything like this.
    Thank in advance.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Welcome to the forum, anhnha.

    /faiv/
    has one syllable. It represents the pronunciation of the word 'five'.
    /faivə/ has two syllables. It represents the pronunciation of 'fiver' (informal word for 'a 5 note').
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  3. #3
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Thanks for your help.
    At first when i pronunce /faiv/ I always think that the v sound is pronouce like /və/ and this make me so confuse.Would you give how i pronunce the v sound in /faiv/? Do It really pronounce v sound?




  4. #4
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    At first when i I pronounce /faiv/ I always think that the 'v' sound is pronouced like /və/ and this make me so confused.spaceWould you give tell me how i I pronunce the 'v' sound in /faiv/? Do It really pronounce v sound? Is it really pronounced/v/?
    five - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Wow,
    Thanks you again.I really learned a lot from your correction.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Wow.
    Thanks you again. (space after a full stop) I really learned a lot from your correction.
    Use "thank you" or "thanks", but not "thanks you".
    As 5jj marked in his previous post, we always put a space after a full stop.

  7. #7
    yangmuye is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Hi.
    English final consonants may be released either audibly or inaudibly.
    When they are audible, they sound to me like initial consonants.

    As you speak Vietnamese(according to your profile), I think you are aware of the difference.
    Final consonants in Vietnamese are usually inaudibly released, which are very different from the initial ones.
    But there is no such difference in English.

    Five o'clock = 'fīv-voc-lŏc. The v is audibly released and becomes the initial of the next syllable.
    Five = fīv. When the t is audibly released, it sounds like there is an very short ə, that is, 'fīv-və.

    It seems to me that, voiced consonants tend to be partially devoiced(/voicelessly released) at final positions. Five may sound like 'fīv-fə. The ə in fə is voiceless, but audible.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye View Post
    Five o'clock = 'fīv-voc-lŏc. The v is audibly released and becomes the initial of the next syllable.
    In that case, you need only the second 'v' in your transcription'
    Five = fīv. When the t v is audibly released, it sounds like there is an very short ə, that is, 'fīv-və.
    This may be true when the word comes at the end of an utterance, but not when it is followed immediately by another phoneme.

    It seems to me that, voiced consonants tend to be partially devoiced(/voicelessly released) at final positions. Five may sound like 'fīv-fə. The ə in fə is voiceless, but audible.
    /v/ may be (partly) devoiced before a voiceless consonant, and is always /f/ in the quasi-modal have to, but not generally in word-final position. An exception to this is the pronunciation of 'five' in the NATO phonetic alphabet.
    5
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  9. #9
    yangmuye is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj
    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye
    Five o'clock = 'fīv-voc-lŏc. The v is audibly released and becomes the initial of the next syllable.
    In that case, you need only the second 'v' in your transcription'
    I wrote two v's on purpose because people with the same problem might distinguish initial and final consonants.
    A final consonant with an audible release might be perceived as a part of the next syllable by them.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj
    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye
    Five = fīv. When the t v is audibly released, it sounds like there is an very short ə, that is, 'fīv-və.
    This may be true when the word comes at the end of an utterance, but not when it is followed immediately by another phoneme.
    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj
    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye
    It seems to me that, voiced consonants tend to be partially devoiced(/voicelessly released) at final positions. Five may sound like 'fīv-fə. The ə in fə is voiceless, but audible.
    /v/ may be (partly) devoiced before a voiceless consonant, and is always /f/ in the quasi-modal have to, but not generally in word-final position. An exception to this is the pronunciation of 'five' in the NATO phonetic alphabet.
    Sorry, I meant at final positionsat the end of an utterance.
    The devoicing of particles like “with”, “of”, etc. before voiceless consonants is another matter.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: The problem with pronunciation.Pleased help

    Quote Originally Posted by yangmuye View Post
    I wrote two v's on purpose because people with the same problem might distinguish initial and final consonants.
    I don't understand the point you are making. One may consider /v/ to be either the final sound of the first syllable, or the initial sound of the second, but it's only one sound - it can't be both.

    Sorry, I meant at final positionsat the end of an utterance.
    I don't agree that, at the end of an utterance, " Five may sound like 'fīv-fə. The ə in fə is voiceless, but audible" .
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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