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Thread: sign off on

  1. #1
    unpakwon is offline Senior Member
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    Default sign off on

    What does "sign off on" mean in the following? Permit or allow?

    It turned out to be an exclusive Q&A with the Apple CEO. One Jobs didn't necessarily sign off on (and would never after all of this). Ethically, the whole thing just seems flaky.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: sign off on

    I'm not sure what you think the distinction between "permit" and "allow" is.

    Permit | Define Permit at Dictionary.com

    The first definition of permit is "to allow."

  3. #3
    unpakwon is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: sign off on

    I thought those two words are almost the same.

    So you agree "sign off on" means "to allow" in the context, don't you?

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: sign off on

    Since this was something involving him, I would say "agree to" is a better definition. He wasn't just going to allow something, he was going to have to do it.

  5. #5
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: sign off on

    But in some companies there's actually a piece of paper involved. If you sign off on something you both agree to it and sign the paper - reording the fact that you've agreed. I don't know whether in Apple at the time this sort of 'sign-off' was involved.

    b

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