Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13
  1. #1
    HanibalII is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    470
    Post Thanks / Like

    Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Hey all, I need a bit of input for this essay. The only part that I have not completed is the Conclusion, which I intend to do in the morning.

    Was just wondering if anybody would be able to spot any serious gramatical flaws etc in this......Its Due monday afternoon so I would greatly appreciate it if somebody could give me some input on it before then...


    Cheers


    I've decided to write about 2 of the characters in great detail (The Prioress and Alisoun) because I felt they were more accessible to me.


    Chaucer always takes an interest in clothes and adornments of dress, not just in the 'General Prologue' but in the tales.
    Select a number of characters from the 'General Prologue' and the 'Miller's Tale' (probably at least five) and discuss what we learn about their attire and what it reveals about their personalities.


    The above comment is the basis of the essay.





    The Miller’s Tale is a small selection of Geoffrey Chaucer’s complete work, The Canterbury Tales. It is assumed that The Canterbury Tales continues on from The General Prologue. There were said to have been over 120 stories in The Canterbury Tales, counting four stories for each pilgrim, two to be completed on the way to Canterbury, and two on the way back, however Chaucer had only ever completed Twenty-Two. (Nortons) While writing these poems, Chaucer depicted much about the attire that each pilgrim wore, as well as large chunks of their personality, and how their attire reflected on that. In this essay, 5 characters will be discussed to learn about their attire and how it impacted as well as created their personality. In the poems The General Prologue and The Miller’s Tale, Geoffrey Chaucer uses a complex style of descriptive writing to intensely describe the characters in the poems, providing an in depth description about the attire of the characters creating strong personalities for each disposition.

    Chaucer uses a string of strong terms to describe and give the reader a vivid mental image of each of his characters, displaying numerous personality traits for each character, such as jealousy, comfort, and over compensation by lavishing themselves in superfluous riches. One such character is The Prioress, giving great detail about her looks and temperament, including the most basic features and emotions that create her personality. Chaucer writes of her in a neutral tone, giving basic descriptions as to how a woman of the era was to behave, but questions how she performs as a nun, taking profit of situations and items that seem inappropriate for a nun when it is expected of them to give up all of their worldly possessions and surrender all items to the church. “A peire of bedes, gauded al with grene, An theron heng a brooch of gold ful sheene,” (Nortons, Line 160-161) He describes her attire in a small section, mostly on how well she is presented in clothes that would not be seen on a nun of the time. Chaucer writes of The Prioress as a person taking advantage of her position, showing that she has access to plenty of food which seems to be a main describing point for Chaucer, as he discusses through many lines the attributes that are due to her well fed stature. “For, hardily, she was nat undergrowe.” (Nortons, Line 156) Through Chaucer’s description an image of a well fed and pompous character is presented, with a cold and hard personality “hir eyen greye as glas” (Nortons, Line 152), with attributes that may make her seem gentle and kind. “Hir mouth ful smal, and therto softe and reed;” (Nortons, Line 154) Through the descriptions of her image, you are able to picture a character closer to Royalty than a Nun of the Clergy, with descriptions close enough to fit a noblewoman of the era. “And peyned hir to countrefete cheere Of court, and been estatlich of manere,” (Nortons, Line 139-140) This description that Chaucer has presented with the reader shows that the particular character is more fond of appearing to be of high stature rather than a commoner or hand of the clergy, in this she is a close fit to the Friar.

    Immediately starting the introduction of The Summoner, Chaucer describes a man that seems to be evil and vile, with an appealing Cherubic face, in this description however; Chaucer seems to present a situation that contradicts his writings, stating further that “Of his visage children were aferd.” (Line 630) Chaucer continues to paint a despicable picture of a man marred by misfortunes through sickness and injury and that no cure would be enough to repair the damage. The Summoner seemingly self condemn’s people that have access to money and that are in good health and well being, deeming them “The curse of the clergy”. However Chaucer gives the impression he does not wish the reader to feel pity for The Summoner, giving the impression that his actions had been inflicted upon himself through excessive drinking and raucous behavior. “And for to drynken strong wyn, reed as blood;” (Line 637). During his drunken stupors, Chaucer defines him as a “Noble Rascal”, portraying him as a troublemaker character that you could not replace. “He was a gentil harlot and a kynde; A bettre felawe sholde men noght fynde;” (Line 649-650)

    The character John the Miller from The Millers tale is an excellent example of Estate Satire in the Canterbury Tales, full filling the role of peasantry. Chaucer portrays The Miller as the dim witted character of the group, being similarly portrayed as a village idiot. However he is the only character in the story that acts with morals, even though it leads him to looking like a fool and being ridiculed by his wife and the town’s people. Chaucer couples The Miller with a much younger woman as his wife to assist in contrasting the difference between himself and other characters. His key personality traits are paranoia and insecurity, with him wanting to control his wife due to her age but also blind devotion shown during the time of the flood. Chaucer portrays him as a fool in instances when he turns a blind eye to obvious events such as absolon serenading his wife outside their window and naďve when he is told of the impending flood by Nicholas. Throughout The Millers tale, Chaucer portrays john as brainless, but blinded by his love of his wife.

  2. #2
    HanibalII is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    470
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Absolom is a fitting picture of a clerk of the parish. Chaucer has seen fit to give him only the bare necessity items, but focuses more on his ability to dance and sing and play music which The Clerk uses to help his cause in “Wooing” Alsioun. His ability to entertain people assists him in persuading and fitting in with the townspeople with little to know difficulty, allowing him to get closer to other people. He is described as having the simplest attire consisting of a basic blue coat and red hose. His face is depicted of that of a small child, with “rosy red cheeks” and eyes as “grey as a goose” covered in a mop of striking golden hair. Chaucer also describes him as squeamish about certain bodily functions, which may imply that his personality is very rigid in what may be appropriate around other people.

    Nicholas is described as a poor scholar, but is sly and meek with many books and readings, so is a well learned character. Chaucer has described him as being able to persuade anybody to his cause. This appears to be a main personality trait that has been implied through his description of Nicholas. His physical description of Nicholas is that of a “Pretty Boy” with a personality that has him thinking he is god’s gift to all. “Ful often blessed was his myrie throte.” Chaucer decorates Nicholas in a fashion comparable to the smell of a rose garden, using this description to alert the reader of his desirable smell and the implications of such a nature that accompany it.

    Chaucer creates an extremely detailed description of Alisoun, which implies many traits for her personality, showing that she likes the attention, in the way she dresses, and likes to show off. To begin, Chaucer describes Alisoun as being petite with the characteristics of a weasel, which may have implications for her personality and behavior. Described as wearing attire that implies great stature and fortune in this current era, such as wearing a girdle made of plain stripes of silk, with an embroided smock with a black collar which further implies wealth and stature as embroided material is quite costly. Chaucer tries to contrast Alisoun with her clothes and skin tone, by saying “Ful brighter was the shynyng of hir hewe Than in the Tour the noble yforged newe.” Allowing the reader to picture a stunningly beautiful woman with a bright complexion placed against a dark background to make her stand out, which seems to be a key personality trait with Alisoun. Chaucer then moves onto her facial features depicting a picture of beauty having “lickerish” eyes with carefully plucked eyebrows colored black and being highly slanted. Chaucer does not wish to allow the reader to make up their mind whether Alisoun is beautiful or not, but forces the reader to picture a woman of beauty by saying “There nys no man so wys that koude thenche So gay a popelote or swich a wenche.” Implying that no man could ever possibly imagine how beautiful this woman is. Chaucer implies her beauty multiple times throughout the story accompanied by items that would greatly contrast her said beauty, such as being described as having skin softer than the wool of a sheep, and being more beautiful than a newly budding pear tree. He spends a little while describing her bodily features, seeming to imply that she shows off cleavage by stating, “A brooch she baar upon hir lowe coler, As brood as is the boos of a bokeler.” As well as having long and slender legs. “Long as a mast, and upright as a bolt.” In this writing, Chaucer has greatly sexualized her character description, which assists in her personality traits.

  3. #3
    HanibalII is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    470
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Anybody??

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Sorry, but we don't help with homework assignments. Your teachers/tutors/supervisors want to see what you can do, not what we can do.

  5. #5
    HanibalII is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    470
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Sorry, but we don't help with homework assignments. Your teachers/tutors/supervisors want to see what you can do, not what we can do.


    An area devoted to writing essays, articles and stories where you can get help and advice about structure and style from other authors. Please note: we do not do homework for people, but we can help you do it!
    I'm just looking for some help with the structure.....So where do you draw the line on helping, and doing it for me?

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    44,191
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    I thought her lickerish eye meant she had a lustful look and was not a reference to the colour, though this is a memory from university thirty years ago.

  7. #7
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    44,191
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Quote Originally Posted by HanibalII View Post
    I'm just looking for some help with the structure.....So where do you draw the line on helping, and doing it for me?
    It's a tricky one to answer and, as practising teachers, most err on the side of caution.

  8. #8
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    It's a tricky one to answer
    It is indeed. Perhaps the words "but we can help you do it!" in that guideline are unhelpful.

  9. #9
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    44,191
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Yeeeees and no- talking as a legitimate source helps, but doling out answers doesn't. I can see your point, though.

  10. #10
    Red5 is offline Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    3,404
    Post Thanks / Like

    Re: Almost Complete Chaucer Essay

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    It is indeed. Perhaps the words "but we can help you do it!" in that guideline are unhelpful.
    Agreed. It's been removed.
    Red5
    Webmaster, UsingEnglish.com

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [Essay] English Essay (Chaucer-The Millers Tale)
    By HanibalII in forum Literature
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-May-2012, 01:06
  2. complete
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2009, 06:39
  3. right/complete
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 16-Apr-2009, 17:26
  4. complete
    By Hanka in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Aug-2007, 00:55
  5. Chaucer/ Spencer/ Milton
    By CHOMAT in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-May-2007, 20:08

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •