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  1. #1
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    Default What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    Hi
    In this sentence "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white", does it mean that just YSL had the right to make clothes in black and white color? Like copyright for books, films etc.
    Thanks a lot.

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    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    In this sentence "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white", does it mean that just YSL had the right to make clothes in black and white color? Like copyright for books, films etc.

    Perhaps the punctuation is confusing the matter.
    If you have given us the complete sentence, then perhaps:
    "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive all right – all of the clothes were in black and white".
    In which case "all right" simply adds emphasis to the assertion that the collection was distinctive.
    For example:"Even from a distance I could tell it was my brother all right – he walks just like that".


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  3. #3
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    Default Re: What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    In this sentence "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white", does it mean that just YSL had the right to make clothes in black and white color? Like copyright for books, films etc.

    Perhaps the punctuation is confusing the matter.
    If you have given us the complete sentence, then perhaps:
    "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive all right – all of the clothes were in black and white".
    In which case "all right" simply adds emphasis to the assertion that the collection was distinctive.
    For example:"Even from a distance I could tell it was my brother all right – he walks just like that".


    not a teacher
    Thanks, but I checked it the punctuation was the one that I mentioned previously. "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white." It's in active skills for reading book, volume three, by Neil J. Anderson.

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    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    Thanks, but I checked it the punctuation was the one that I mentioned previously. "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white." It's in active skills for reading book, volume three, by Neil J. Anderson.

    The hyphenated construction "right-all" has no meaning here. Without seeing the book itself I can't be sure, but in the original there are probably spaces before and after the dash between "right" and "all", and that it is a long dash, not a short hyphen ( and not - ). So the last part of the sentence is divided from the first part in the way I've written it:
    "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right all of the clothes were in black and white."
    The comma after "distinctive" is probably optional, but I feel it's unnecessary.

    It's possible that the long dash (em dash) is used in a style that was once more common, with little or no space before and after. If so, I still think the structure and meaning are as I've suggested.

    not a teacher

  5. #5
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    Default Re: What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    Quote Originally Posted by JMurray View Post
    Thanks, but I checked it the punctuation was the one that I mentioned previously. "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right-all of the clothes were in black and white." It's in active skills for reading book, volume three, by Neil J. Anderson.

    The hyphenated construction "right-all" has no meaning here. Without seeing the book itself I can't be sure, but in the original there are probably spaces before and after the dash between "right" and "all", and that it is a long dash, not a short hyphen ( – and not - ). So the last part of the sentence is divided from the first part in the way I've written it:
    "His first YSL collection, a big hit, was distinctive, all right – all of the clothes were in black and white."
    The comma after "distinctive" is probably optional, but I feel it's unnecessary.

    It's possible that the long dash (em dash) is used in a style that was once more common, with little or no space before and after. If so, I still think the structure and meaning are as I've suggested.

    not a teacher
    Thanks JMurray. I checked it. It's a dash not a hyphen. You're right. However there's no space before and after that. The two words (right and all) are suck to it. I reckon you're right. Thanks for the help.

  6. #6
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: What is the meaning of "all right-all of something"?

    Thanks JMurray. I checked it. It's a dash not a hyphen. You're right. However there's no space before and after that. The two words (right and all) are stuck to it.

    Good, I think we've sorted it out, moonlike. With the "en dash" and the longer "em dash", there are all sorts of opinions and ideas about how they should be used (en or em, spaces/no spaces etc), if you're interested you can go here.
    Dash - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    not a teacher

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