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Thread: compish?

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: compish?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    ... I imagine any real members of a Corleone family in Italy are appalled at the mispronunciation of their name!
    I imagine not. There was variation in the film, but if I remember right the village of Corleone was in Sicily. Locals - in the part of the film set in Sicily - tended to drop the final vowel. So did the older Corleones in the US, although Corleones born in the USA used the official pronunciation - having learnt that 'that's what Italians do'. 'Italian' (both the nationality and the language) is a relatively modern concept). My sister-in-law, from Calabria (not too far from Sicily), tends to drop her final -Es, as did a schoolfriend of mine with the unlikely name of Inglese (always addressed by one teacher as 'Ingleesh'); his family, I believe, were from Naples.

    The American use of capisce, with the Anglicized pronunciation (of the original Sicilian capisc' reflected in the spelling 'capeesh')has been adopted in the criminal world - even among people who know nothing of Italian (still less the Italic dialect spoken in rural Sicily in the late 19th and early 20th century)

    b

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #12

    Re: compish?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    'Italian' (both the nationality and the language) is a relatively modern concept).
    That's right Bob. It was only after 1871, with the unification of Italy, that Sicilians and Venetians, etc. were expected to speak Italian - which is based on Tuscan. My paternal grandmother, from Lombardy, was considered educated because she could speak Italian. (OK, I'm old, as were my father and grandmother, so that's a while back now).

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