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  1. #1
    naweewra is offline Member
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    Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    Hello,

    I'm a little bit confused. Should it be:

    a) Scary Old Harry

    b) Old Scary Harry

    It is meant to be a name, that's why the "s" and "o" are capitalised.

    And while we are at it, should it be:

    a) Bold Little Jack

    b) Little Bold Jack

    Thank you.

    Nawee

  2. #2
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    Quote Originally Posted by naweewra View Post
    Hello,

    I'm a little bit confused. Should it be:

    a) Scary Old Harry

    b) Old Scary Harry

    It is meant to be a name, that's why the "s" and "o" are capitalised.

    And while we are at it, should it be:

    a) Bold Little Jack

    b) Little Bold Jack

    Thank you.

    Nawee
    If his name is Scary Harry, it should be "old Scary Harry", unless it's the start of a sentence. Otherwise, if his name is Harry, it's "scary old Harry". Otherwise, if his name is Old Scary Harry or Scary Old Harry, then that's how you write it.
    Same for Jack. What's his actual name, and what is merely an adjective?

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    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    Scary Old Harry has a better flow to it.

  4. #4
    BrunaBC's Avatar
    BrunaBC is offline Member
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    Re: Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Scary Old Harry has a better flow to it.
    But only if you consider scary as an adjective, otherwise (in an attributive perpective) the adj must come before the noun.
    I wouldn't say Michael talented Jackson. I'm sorry, perhaps I just didn't follow
    Not a teacher.

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    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    "Scary" and "old" are both adjectives, aren't they? If I knew someone named Harry and I was going to nickname him with those two adjectives, I am saying that "Scary Old Harry" sounds better and flows off the tongue better than "Old Scary Harry."

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    Raymott's Avatar
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    Re: Position of adjectives: "scary old Harry" or "old scary Harry"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Scary" and "old" are both adjectives, aren't they? If I knew someone named Harry and I was going to nickname him with those two adjectives, I am saying that "Scary Old Harry" sounds better and flows off the tongue better than "Old Scary Harry."
    Of course it does. But if he is already known widely as Scary Harry, and you merely want to describe him as old, he would have to be old Scary Harry. That's why I asked what he was known as, ie. What's is his name?

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