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  1. #1
    eggcracker's Avatar
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    Default Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Does the phrase "put into effect" in the original sentence mean " in practice" or "practically"?
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are put into effect.(Original sentence)
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are inexpensive in practice.(right?)
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are inexpensive practically.(right?)

    In addition to this question, can I use "are gone into effect" or "are come into effect" instead of "are put into effect"?
    Last edited by eggcracker; 06-Jun-2012 at 20:41. Reason: I asked one more question

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    Does the phrase "put into effect" in the original sentence mean " in practice" or "practically"?
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are put into effect.(Original sentence)
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are inexpensive in practice.(right?)
    Gas percentage is likely to rise in coming years if carbon prices are inexpensive practically.(right?)
    They are all meaningless to me I'm afraid.

  3. #3
    eggcracker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    They are all meaningless to me I'm afraid.
    Perhaps there must be error in my book....
    Doesn't the phrase "put into effect" mean "in practice" or "practically" except for the sentences I mentioned?

  4. #4
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    "Put into effect" does not mean "practically" or "in practice." It means something has become active. Like "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, when the city's new smoking ban went into effect."

  5. #5
    eggcracker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Put into effect" does not mean "practically" or "in practice." It means something has become active. Like "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, when the city's new smoking ban went into effect."
    Thank you now I can understand the phrases.
    Is it right to understand your sentence as below?
    "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, and after the day the city's new smoking ban went into effect."
    Oh, I have more question about this.
    If I say the sentence
    "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, when the city's new smoking ban went into effect.".
    I maybe pause at the comma. But can I use the expression right above when I make a conversation with other people?
    Or can this kind of sentence be used in the News on air?

    Last edited by eggcracker; 06-Jun-2012 at 21:14.

  6. #6
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    At midnight the new law went into effect. At 11:59 PM it was legal to smoke inside. At 12 midnight, it was not. The law went into effect at midnight.

  7. #7
    eggcracker's Avatar
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    At midnight the new law went into effect. At 11:59 PM it was legal to smoke inside. At 12 midnight, it was not. The law went into effect at midnight.
    So, do the sentences I transformed mean the same as original?

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    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Is it right to understand your sentence as below?
    "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, and after the day the city's new smoking ban went into effect."
    No. "When" does not translate to "and after the day."

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    No. "When" does not translate to "and after the day."
    Thank you. Now I get at least how to understand the original sentence.
    Incidentally, I've been schooled that I should translate the structure such as "~, when" , "~, who"
    into the expressions like "~, and after that time", "~, and someone do something/~, and someone is something"
    It's quite confusing. Would you give me some grammar rule if possible?

  10. #10
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: Does the phrase "put into effect" mean " in practice" or "practically"?

    "The smokers enjoyed their last indoor cigarette right before midnight, when the city's new smoking ban went into effect."
    In this case the "when" is to be understood like "...midnight, which was the time when the city's..."

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