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Thread: letting go

  1. #1
    goodstudent is offline Member
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    letting go

    How to use "letting go"?

    Can I say:

    A) I am letting go of my printer

    B) I am letting go of my printer as I do not use it anymore

    Does "letting go" has the meaning of something that the seller does not need anymore and it will let the buyer feel that the seller would be selling it cheap because it seems useless to the buyer?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Re: letting go

    How to use "letting go"?
    Can I say:
    A) I am letting go of my printer.
    B) I am letting go of my printer as I do not use it anymore.

    Does "letting go" has the meaning of something that the seller does not need anymore and it will let the buyer feel that the seller would be selling it cheap because it seems useless to the buyer?


    Both A and B are OK grammatically. Perhaps B is a little redundant in that presumably you wouldn't be letting it go if you were still using it.
    I don't think "letting go" necessarily suggests that you would sell it for any small amount, it just means that you don't require it any more for whatever reason.
    If you said that you were getting rid of it or ditching it, then the buyer might be looking to pay a fairly low price.

    If you're writing an advert you could take a different approach.
    "I have an Acme 2000 printer in good working order for sale at $150 or near offer"
    … or something like that.


    not a teacher

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: letting go

    I wouldn't use let go there. If, for example, a company has to get rid of some employees, often because the company is in financial difficulty, then you could say that they had to let some workers go.

  4. #4
    goodstudent is offline Member
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    Re: letting go

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I wouldn't use let go there. If, for example, a company has to get rid of some employees, often because the company is in financial difficulty, then you could say that they had to let some workers go.
    So A) and B) are actually wrong english?

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: letting go

    To me, they sound as if you're getting rid of a person who prints and not a machine. I wouldn't use them.

  6. #6
    goodstudent is offline Member
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    Re: letting go

    Is there any other phrases that have the similar to the meaning "don't require it any more"

  7. #7
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Re: letting go

    I agree. The only case in which I'd use it for objects is when they have obvious sentimental value, e.g. the seven-year-old was persuaded to let go of her teddy bear during school hours.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    I wouldn't use let go there. If, for example, a company has to get rid of some employees, often because the company is in financial difficulty, then you could say that they had to let some workers go.

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