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  1. #1
    moonlike's Avatar
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    Default Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    Hi
    Could you kindly tell me what the difference between "lead" is in the following sentences?


    1. There are no other children in the family for the child to associate with, and this may lead to the child feeling lonely at times.
    2. Corruption can lead officials to tolerate ecological damage.


    Does it mean result in/cause in both?
    Are both structures correct? Can they be used interchangeably? Lead to someone doing something/ lead somebody to do something?

    P.S. Sorry I had asked this question before and had started a thread before. However, I made a wild guess about the difference then and since then I had been waiting for someone to kindly help me and say whether my guess was right or not? As I got no reply I started a new thread, because I come across this structure a lot in the articles.
    Last edited by moonlike; 15-Jun-2012 at 10:22.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    Not a teacher.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunaBC View Post
    It's lead somebody to do something.
    It's also lead to something - to have something as a result (also from the OALD). Both moonlike's sentences are possible. Whether they are interchangeable or not is something I am still thinking about.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  4. #4
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    If I "lead somebody to do something" then I am directing them to do something I want. I lead my daughter into playing sports.

    If my actions "lead somebody to do something" it may not be my intention. Like "My drinking at the pub lead my wife to leave me."

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    If I "lead somebody to do something" then I am directing them to do something I want. I lead my daughter into playing sports.
    This may be true of grammatical subject which are human, but is not true of things - My wife's death led me to throw up my job and take to drink.

    I think this is also possible: George Harrison led me to take up the guitar. The speaker may mean that his admiration for Harrison caused him to take up the guitar; only context will tell us, but the fact is, this is possible.

    There is also: My wife led me to drink. My alcoholic wife was the cause of the beginning of my own alcohol problem, but she did not direct me to begin drinking.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  6. #6
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    It must be early in the morning. I meant "led" in those sentences. Past tense.

    Yes, my comments were about leading human beings.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    Thank you all. To be honest I still didn't get the difference, of course if there are any.
    Being a non-native teacher, I'm so thrilled being in such a superb forum.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    ***** NOT A TEACHER *****


    May I add my two bits?

    I had never thought about this matter until I read your post.

    You have already received excellent posts from Bruna, 5jj, and Soothing Dave.

    *****

    My only contribution is this:

    1. During my membership here, I have noticed that UsingEnglish.com lets its members link to other grammar helplines,

    just as other helplines permit linking to UsingEnglish.com.

    2. Since I am too stupid to know how to link, I would like to recommend that you go to Google and type these

    words:

    To lead to + gerund or infinitive? Word Reference

    This November 26, 2009, thread has 14 posts. You may find something of interest.

    (P.S. If you have already read this thread, please excuse me for recommending it.)


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Lead to somebody doing something OR lead somebody to do something

    All you have to do is highlight the address and press Control and C at the same time to copy the address, and then Control and V at the same time to paste it.

    to lead to + gerund or infinitive ? - WordReference Forums
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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