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  1. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #1

    Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    I saw a sentence which quite confusing because of "of".
    Is "many of the planes" left out in this below sentence? Or "of" mean "by far"?
    "Many of the planes she flew were of dangerously experimental design."

    Any explanation would help me a lot. Thank you in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    I saw a sentence which quite confusing because of "of".
    Is "many of the planes" left out in this below sentence? Or "of" mean "by far"?
    "Many of the planes she flew were of dangerously experimental design."

    Any explanation would help me a lot. Thank you in advance.
    The sentence is fine as it is.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    I saw a sentence which quite confusing because of "of".
    Is "many of the planes" left out in this below sentence? Or "of" mean "by far"?
    "Many of the planes she flew were of dangerously experimental design."

    Any explanation would help me a lot. Thank you in advance.
    I don't really see how you think that sentence could be constructed with another 'many of the the planes'. The design of the planes was dangerously experimental.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    The planes were of a specific design.
    Many of the planes were of a specific design.
    Many of the planes were of dangerously experimental design.

    A dangerously experimental design was used to build many of the planes. Consequently, many of the planes are of that design.

  5. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    Hello.
    I'd like to check if I understand the matter correctly if I may.(I think I can understand eggcrackers confusion.)

    I can think of several expressions using 'be of...'

    1. be of good quality
    2. (be) of noble birth
    3. be of importance/use/value
    4. be of the opinion that...

    Is the "be of" used in eggcracker's example sentence similar to (or the same as ) #1?

    eggcrackers : "Many of the planes she flew were of dangerously experimental design."

    Thank you in advance.

  6. eggcracker's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Is repetitive subject left out? Or does "of" mean "by far"?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The planes were of a specific design.
    Many of the planes were of a specific design.
    Many of the planes were of dangerously experimental design.

    A dangerously experimental design was used to build many of the planes. Consequently, many of the planes are of that design.
    Eureka!
    Thank you all.
    I understood the sentence, I suppose.
    "Many of the planes she flew were (the planes) of dangerously experimental design."

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