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  1. #1
    NewHopeR is offline Senior Member
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    Default Does "stable" mean "healthy" here?

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    Living Alone Associated With Higher Risk of Mortality, Cardiovascular Death

    ScienceDaily (June 18, 2012) Living alone was associated with an increased risk of death and cardiovascular death in an international study of stable outpatients at risk of or with arterial vascular disease (such as coronary disease or peripheral vascular disease), according to a report published Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine, a JAMA Network publication.

  2. #2
    charliedeut's Avatar
    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: Does "stable" mean "healthy" here?

    Hi,

    IMO, what it means is that the outpatients (outpatient - WordReference.com Dictionary of English) were the object of study. This doesn't mean they were healthy ("...at risk of or with arterial vascular disease..."), just that their state was not as bad as to make them stay in hospital = their health was stabilised, not fully restored.

    Greetings,

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Does "stable" mean "healthy" here?

    "Stable" when used in a medical context rarely means "healthy". It's usually used simply to mean that the situation has reached a point where nothing sudden or acute is happening. Someone in Intensive Care might be "critical but stable" - they are extremely ill but nothing much is changing.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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