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Thread: reimburse

  1. #1
    thomas615 is offline Member
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    Default reimburse

    I am trying to make a sentence with the word "reimburse"

    He is wondering if we can reimburse him for his travel expenses.

    He is wondering if we will reimburse him for his travel expenses.

  2. #2
    abaka is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: reimburse

    Both are correct. The second is better, I think, since the real question is not whether we have the means to issue payment, but whether we have the desire to do so.

    PS. Small point, but you may want to change "if" to "whether". That's the traditional way to introduce an indirect quesion with two possible outcomes. Today both "if" and "whether" are common enough to be acceptable.
    Last edited by abaka; 22-Jun-2012 at 08:16. Reason: added PS

  3. #3
    Likeahike is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: reimburse

    I work for a Dutch insurance company and when speaking to English clients, we usually use 'reimburse' and 'reimbursement' when explaining how much money they will receive based on an estimate or after sending us an invoice. As for a sentence, I can imagine myself saying: "We will reimburse your dental treatment 75% up to a maximum of 450,- per year. You will receive the reimbursement within ten days of invoicing."

    Mind you, I'm not a native speaker. Cloggie through and through.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: reimburse

    Quote Originally Posted by Likeahike View Post
    I work for a Dutch insurance company and when speaking to English clients, we usually use 'reimburse' and 'reimbursement' when explaining how much money they will receive based on an estimate or after sending us an invoice. As for a sentence, I can imagine myself saying: "We will reimburse your dental treatment 75% up to a maximum of € 450,- per year. You will receive the reimbursement within ten days of invoicing."

    Mind you, I'm not a native speaker. Cloggie through and through.
    As far as your example goes, I would use "We will reimburse 75% of the cost of your dental treatment (up to a maximum of €450 per year). You will receive payment within ten days".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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