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  1. #1
    learning54's Avatar
    learning54 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Could 'at an inferior rapidity' be a suitable explanation for 'slower'?

    Hi teachers,
    Could 'at an inferior rapidity' be a suitable explanation for 'slower' and 'more slowly' according to the sentence given?
    Deborah drives a bit slower and much more carefully than him.

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by learning54; 23-Jun-2012 at 12:56.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Could 'at an inferior rapidity' be a suitable explanation for 'slower'?

    Only if you're trying to nonplus your students by sounding pompous, loquacious and periphrastic, and to have them reaching for the nearest dictionary.

    Rover

  3. #3
    learning54's Avatar
    learning54 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Could 'at an inferior rapidity' be a suitable explanation for 'slower'?

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Only if you're trying to nonplus your students by sounding pompous, loquacious and periphrastic, and to have them reaching for the nearest dictionary. Rover
    Hi Rover,
    Thank you for your reply.
    When I found explanations like the one I've aked for and they are right; I use them to help the students to undertand the word, not to use the explanation in real life. As you've said they sound too pompous, loquacious, and periphrastic.

    L.

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