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  1. #1
    Graduate7's Avatar
    Graduate7 is offline Newbie
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    Question NOSTRIFICATION - is this term used in English ? Transfer of a foreign diploma?

    NOSTRIFICATION - how do you understand this term? Is it used in English with the same meaning? The definition would be more or less the following: acceptance and transfer of the foreign diploma (degree) into our local qualifications. Is it used in the UK? It is supposed to be a corresponding term to the Polish: nostryfikacja.
    Last edited by Graduate7; 23-Jun-2012 at 15:40. Reason: correction

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: NOSTRIFICATION - is this term used in English ? Meaning: transfer of foreign dipl

    Welcome to the forums, Graduate7.

    It's the first time I've ever heard the word, and this site, which searches over a hundred dictionaries, finds it in only six sources — none of them major ones.

    It's probably only used in the more rarefied strata of academia, if at all.

    Rover

  3. #3
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: NOSTRIFICATION - is this term used in English ? Meaning: transfer of foreign dipl

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    Welcome to the forums, Graduate7.

    It's the first time I've ever heard the word, and this site, which searches over a hundred dictionaries, finds it in only six sources — none of them major ones.

    It's probably only used in the more rarefied strata of academia, if at all.

    Rover
    Must be that - academic jargon (if anything!). The latin noster means 'our'; so 'nostrification' just means (literally) 'making ours'; in the academic context, 'recognising your (foreign) qualification as being as good as ours'.

    In other contexts (so not specifically academic) constitutions can have something called 'a grandfather clause', which recognises as valid a document that doesn't conform with local standards. This has given rise to an informal back-formed verb: 'to grandfather in'. For example, anyone who takes out a driving licence in the UK today gets a plastic card that incorporates a photograph of the holder. But my old paper one is still valid, as the specification of what constitues a valid UK licence has 'a grandfather clause'.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 23-Jun-2012 at 17:12. Reason: fix typo

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