Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Nov 2009
    • Posts: 1,049
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Does "has got teeth" mean "is pungent"? Why use "gal", nor "girl"?

    Context:

    Critical acclaim fro Sandra Brown
    "If you want romantic suspense that has got teeth, Sandra Brown is your gal" Stephen King

  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Does "has got teeth" mean "is pungent"? Why use "gal", nor "girl"?

    NOT A TEACHER

    There is no particular reason why he said "gal". "Gal" is just another (informal) word that means "woman" or "girl". It's commonly used in AmE.

    I don't know exactly what he means by "has got teeth", but I assume that he's praising this author by saying that she writes very suspenseful books. In any case, "has got teeth" is saying something positive about the way the author writes romantic suspense.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 23-Jun-2012 at 17:18.

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 1,952
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Does "has got teeth" mean "is pungent"? Why use "gal", nor "girl"?

    Hello.
    I agree with Chicken Sandwich.
    It's not "have got teeth", but I've found "have teeth" here (Please see IDIOMS): tooth - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

  3. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
      • Home Country:
      • Russian Federation
      • Current Location:
      • Netherlands

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 1,458
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Does "has got teeth" mean "is pungent"? Why use "gal", nor "girl"?

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.
    I agree with Chicken Sandwich.
    It's not "have got teeth", but I've found "have teeth" here (Please see IDIOMS): tooth - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com
    I didn't know this expression. In any case

    "If you want romantic suspense that has got teeth, Sandra Brown is your gal"
    and

    "If you want romantic suspense that has teeth, Sandra Brown is your gal"
    should mean the same thing. Expressions are usually flexible, in that you can change a word and still retain the original meaning.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Jun-2012, 18:55
  2. Defining "Street," "Road," "Avenue," "Boulevard"
    By ahumphreys in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2010, 08:14
  3. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 09:36
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 09:27
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 20:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •