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  1. #1
    Over the top's Avatar
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    Default written (American)

    How the tt in written is pronounced?
    I heard it like a glotal stop

  2. #2
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    Default Re: written (American)

    Quote Originally Posted by Over the top View Post
    How the tt in written is pronounced?
    I heard it like a glotal stop
    It is pronounced as a single 't'; as in 'hit', 'bit', and 'sit'.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: written (American)

    The pronunciation varies from person to person and from dialect to dialect.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: written (American)

    The best way to learn how "written" (or any word for that matter) is pronounced, is to listen for yourself. A lot of dictionaries come with a CD-ROM, which provide ample oppurtunity to listen to both the British and American pronunciation of a particular word.

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    Default Re: written (American)

    Add a nasal release to Amigo4's suggestion. That's what you hear in American English.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: written (American)

    Quote Originally Posted by raindoctor View Post
    Add a nasal release to Amigo4's suggestion. That's what you hear in American English.
    That is true of 'written', when the /t/ can be followed directly by the nasal/n/ in some varieties of English, but it is not true when /t/ is followed by other sounds, or when a schwa (or other vowel) sound is produced between /t/ and /n/.

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    Default Re: written (American)

    Well, it is a complex phonological environment.

    This is what I wrote on englishforums for a similar question.

    In the following cases, the first V is stressed.

    1. VtVn, t is nasally released.(cf. button, mutton, glutton, Manhattan, written, beaten, Clayton, etc)
    2. VntVn, t is nasally released (cf. Trenton, NJ; Scranton, NJ; Mountain View, CA; sentence, etc). The first V is nasalized. 3. Vrtn, t is nasally released (certain, Morton, hearten, Dumbarton bridge, Wharton school, Barton, etc)
    4. Vltn: in some words, t is nasally released; in some others, it is not.
    4a. No nasal release, instead there is a schwa between t and n in these words: Hilton, Milton, Dalton, Elton, Shelton, CT, Bolton, Dolton, IL, etc. MW transcribes Dalton with a nasal release, but when you hear the Dalton's sound file there, it is not nasally released. However, LPD transcribes with a nasal release and the sound file matches with it.
    4b. Nasal release in these words: Walton (from MW), sultan, etc.

    How about words like gluttony? Here, you see sonorant gemination. gluttony = glutton (pattern 1) + nee

  8. #8
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    Default Re: written (American)

    What you wrote may be true some speakers of AmE, but is not true of all Americans I have met.

    Quote Originally Posted by raindoctor View Post
    However, LPD transcribes with a nasal release
    My 3rd edition transcribes it as: t ən
    gluttony = glutton (pattern 1) + nee
    Should that not be glutton + ee?

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