Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 240
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Which one is correct?

    Which one is correct?
    1/He was absent because of raining.
    2/He was absent because of rain.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Israel
      • Current Location:
      • Israel

    • Join Date: Mar 2010
    • Posts: 79
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Which one is correct?

    [QUOTE=diplomacy;895383]Which one is correct?
    1/He was absent because of raining.
    2/He was absent because of rain.[/QUOTE

    both sentences are grammatically correct
    because of is followed by a noun phrase so rain and raining are both nouns

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mohammadhelmi View Post
    b Both sentences are grammatically correct
    because 'of' is followed by a noun phrase, so 'rain' and 'raining' are both nouns.
    The first sentence is not correct. 'Raining' is not a noun.

  2. BrunaBC's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: May 2012
    • Posts: 238
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Which one is correct?

    I'd say "[...] because of the rain."
    Without the article it seems there's something missing
    Not a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,987
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunaBC View Post
    I'd say "[...] because of the rain."
    Without the article it seems there's something missing
    It can be used without the article. We regularly omit the article when it follows "due to", instead of "because of".

    He was absent because of rain.
    He was absent because of the rain.
    He was absent due to the rain.
    He was absent due to rain.
    He was absent because it was raining.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 3,505
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Quote Originally Posted by BrunaBC View Post
    I'd say "[...] because of the rain."
    Without the article it seems there's something missing
    Given a choice between use with or without the article, I would use the article also, but I agree with emsr2d2's other possibilities as well.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 24,987
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: Which one is correct?

    Some phrases work better with no article. For example, if bad weather causes the cancellation of an event, then I would expect to see on a sign "Match cancelled due to rain", "Garden party cancelled due to bad weather". However, that construction is quite reminiscent of newspaper headlines where various words can be omitted due to limited space (note, not "due to the limited space"!)
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

Similar Threads

  1. Is tense correct and are words correct/needed?
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2009, 17:50
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25-Jun-2009, 04:06
  3. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 19-Jun-2008, 14:09
  4. Correct English-urgent request to correct sentences
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 28-Nov-2006, 19:25

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •