Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    beachboy's Avatar
    beachboy is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default TO STOP SHORT OF DOING SOMETHING

    I stopped short of hitting him.
    Does it mean exactly the same as "I almost hit him"? What else does the expression convey?

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,342
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: TO STOP SHORT OF DOING SOMETHING

    It's hard to say. It could mean the person did other things (yelled at him, verbally intimidated him, maybe even pushed him), but did not physically strike him with force. Or it could mean the person did nothing to him at all, but he was tempted to, to, and almost got to the point where he would, hit him.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] stop short of..
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2010, 08:24
  2. [General] Mr, Mrs and St - Full stop or no full stop in British English
    By Paulovatt in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2010, 05:55
  3. to stop short of
    By beachboy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Feb-2010, 14:55
  4. Stop short at
    By twilit in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2008, 06:12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •