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    #1

    fall off versus fall over

    Hi forum!

    What's the difference in use between fall off and fall over? And does a fall from exist?

    And do we use fall off of sometimes?

    Thanks in advance!

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    #2

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    You can fall off your bike.

    You can fall over when you're drunk.

    You can fall from grace or fall from a tree.

    You can fall in love and later you can fall behind with your alimony.

    You can fall within a certain percentile.

    You can fall about laughing and fall down dead.

    BE speakers do not normally say 'off of'. It irritates us a bit.

    Rover
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 26-Jun-2012 at 19:26.

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    #3

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    Thanks! So you can fall from a tree, but you can't fall from a bike? Because you fall off a bike ?

    Thanks a lot !!

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    #4

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    Quote Originally Posted by virus99 View Post
    So you can fall from a tree, but you can't fall from a bike? Because you fall off a bike ?
    'Fall from a bike' is not a natural collocation.

    You fall from a height.

    Rover

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    And you can fall on your knees.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    And you can fall out of bed or fall out with your friend. (not necessarily at the same time)

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    #7

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    No responses for a couple of minutes. Interest in this thread must be falling off.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    And you can fall on your knees.
    Or fall to your knees.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. CarloSsS's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post

    BE speakers do not normally say 'off of'. It irritates us a bit.
    Is "off of" correct in AmE? Both in formal and informal speech.
    Please note that I'm not a teacher.

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    #10

    Re: fall off versus fall over

    Quote Originally Posted by virus99 View Post
    Hi forum!

    What's the difference in use between fall off and fall over? And does a fall from exist?

    And do we use fall off of sometimes?

    Thanks in advance!
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...rrect-not.html
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 27-Jun-2012 at 00:42.

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