Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 4,628
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    through unfamiliar music

    1. Does this "through" mean "from the begining to the end" or "with"?
    2. Do the two as mean "in the way" or "because"?
    3. What is the subject of "leading"? Is it "composers"? Then, doesn't it have to be "leading themselves"? Is it an exceptional case of reflexive pronoun?

    ex)Fourteenth-century approaches to music had a deep and continuing impact on music and musical life in later centuries. Perhaps most significant was the invention of a precise and unambiguous notation that could record a wide variety of rhythms and allowed music to be distributed in writing...We now take this for granted when we play from notation and sight-read through unfamiliar music, but it was a remarkable innovation in the fourteenth century. Among its effects was that composers could fix their music exactly as they wished it to be performed, as(in the way?) poets had long been able to set down thier poems, leading them to take pride in authorship as(in the way?)few composers had done before the fourteenth century...

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 45,571
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    From the beginning to the end (it could be a section, etc- it's the part you play from beginning to end)

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 27,699
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. Does this "through" mean "from the begining to the end" or "with"?
    2. Do the two as mean "in the way" or "because"?
    3. What is the subject of "leading"? Is it "composers"? Then, doesn't it have to be "leading themselves"? Is it an exceptional case of reflexive pronoun?

    ex)Fourteenth-century approaches to music had a deep and continuing impact on music and musical life in later centuries. Perhaps most significant was the invention of a precise and unambiguous notation that could record a wide variety of rhythms and allowed music to be distributed in writing...We now take this for granted when we play from notation and sight-read through unfamiliar music, but it was a remarkable innovation in the fourteenth century. Among its effects was that composers could fix their music exactly as they wished it to be performed, as(in the way?) poets had long been able to set down thier poems, leading them to take pride in authorship as(in the way?)few composers had done before the fourteenth century...
    The thing "leading them to take pride" is the ability to "fix their music exactly as they wished it be performed". Poets had been able to do that for many years and now, with the invention of musical notation, composers could do the same thing, which led them to take pride in authorship. The writer used "leading" instead of "which led".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 4,628
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    Thanks a lot! Do you think the last "as" also refers to "in the way" or "because"?

  4. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 15,873
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    [This was for Ems] (But I'm not sure why the writer chose 'leading'. It let them take pride in their work. Maybe by letting them, in principle, take pride in their works it led them (in practice) to take pride in authorship; if that's what it meant, it's very lazily put.)

    keannu: the second 'as' does mean 'in the [same] way [as]'.

    b

  5. keannu's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Dec 2010
    • Posts: 4,628
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    It seems quite a rare case that participial phrase such as ",leading" can be interpreted as "which led" as I haven't encoutered this kind of structure. Participial phrase in the middle of a sentence usually has the subject of the sentence as its subject.
    But as 5jj emphasized, there's no limited slots(not sluts) of interpretation or rules. I realized rules or grammar didn't come into being in the beginning, resulting in a language, but people just made rules or grammar out of an ocean-like language for convenience. There's tons of ruleless rules, I guess.

    ex)Among its effects was that composers could fix their music exactly as they wished it to be performed, as(in the way?) poets had long been able to set down thier poems, leading(which led) them to take pride in authorship as(in the way?)few composers had done before the fourteenth century...

  6. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 17,867
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #7

    Re: through unfamiliar music

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    It seems quite a rare case that participial phrase such as ",leading" can be interpreted as "which led" as I haven't encoutered this kind of structure.
    It's very common.

    Nation A did something for Nation B, opening the way for better relations between the two countries. [which opened]
    etc

    As for your question about "as" -- you are an advanced enough student to know that "because" would have made NO SENSE at all. You have done that before - asked about two meanings when only one could possibly be correct. I wonder why you do that. You must know the answer.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-May-2012, 07:10
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Apr-2011, 03:05
  3. an unfamiliar phrase
    By Eve9 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Nov-2009, 12:01
  4. Unfamiliar phrases
    By asiankid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-May-2008, 21:43

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •