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  1. #1
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default How to answer this?

    Honey, the cat's stuck in the tree. Can you turn off the radio and get a ladder…?
    —Oh, it jumped off. _______ .
    A.All right B. Take care C. Never mind D. No problem

    I came across such a puzzling conversation.
    Is it naturally made from a native's point of view?
    Which reply is socially fit for this situation?

    Thanks!

    Jason

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    Yes, it sounds like a perfectly plausible, fairly informal conversation. Which answer do you think fits? Or which definitely don't fit?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    Frankly speaking, I got confused over it.

    So I NEED your help and explanation!

    Thanks

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    Frankly speaking, I got confused over it.

    So I NEED your help and explanation!

    Thanks
    Confusion is a common and standard expectation but we still don't like to simply give you the answer. Let us take one of the choices as an example: B. Take care.

    What does that phrase mean? Does it fit with the rest of the conversation?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    OK. I got your point.

    "Take care" means "be careful"
    "Never mind", in my opinion, is used after replying to "sorry" in order to comfort others.
    "All right" and "No problem" seem to have the same meaning.

    Therefore, I don't know which one to choose from, since none within my knowledge fits in with the situation.

    Maybe "never mind" is closest to the answer, that's also what I want to confirm with you.

    So can you give an answer to me now?

    Thanks anyway!

  6. #6
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    OK. I got your point.

    "Take care" means "be careful"
    "Never mind", in my opinion, is used after replying to "sorry" in order to comfort others.
    "All right" and "No problem" seem to have the same meaning.

    Therefore, I don't know which one to choose from, since none within my knowledge fits in with the situation.

    Maybe "never mind" is closest to the answer, that's also what I want to confirm with you.

    So can you give an answer to me now?

    Thanks anyway!
    "Never mind" is the only one that fits.

  7. #7
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    "Never mind" is the correct answer, but your confusion comes from your misunderstanding of how it's used.

    If I apologize to you for, say, bumping into you, I would not expect "Never mind" as a response.
    A: I'm sorry about that.
    B: Oh, it's nothing, don't worry about it.
    B: It's quite all right
    B: It's okay.
    B: It's no problem - really.
    B: Thank you. I appreciate your apology
    but not: Never mind (At least, not in American use.)

    "Never mind" means "you don't have to do anything."

    A: Have you seen my glasses? Oh... never mind. They are on top of m head.
    A: Please take out the garbage. Oh, never mind. I see John did it before he left for school.
    A: Get cat - he's stuck in the tree. Oh... never mind. He's jumped down.
    Even: A: Would you please [do X]. After no response: Oh never MIND! I"ll do it myself! (Annoyed)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  8. #8
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "Never mind" is the correct answer, but your confusion comes from your misunderstanding of how it's used.

    If I apologize to you for, say, bumping into you, I would not expect "Never mind" as a response.
    A: I'm sorry about that.
    B: Oh, it's nothing, don't worry about it.
    B: It's quite all right
    B: It's okay.
    B: It's no problem - really.
    B: Thank you. I appreciate your apology
    but not: Never mind (At least, not in American use.)

    "Never mind" means "you don't have to do anything."

    A: Have you seen my glasses? Oh... never mind. They are on top of m head.
    A: Please take out the garbage. Oh, never mind. I see John did it before he left for school.
    A: Get cat - he's stuck in the tree. Oh... never mind. He's jumped down.
    Even: A: Would you please [do X]. After no response: Oh never MIND! I"ll do it myself! (Annoyed)
    Dear Barb_D,

    Thanks for your detailed instructions, which I have kept in mind.

    The only problem is that this conversation is between two people.

    In your example, it seems that there is one person in it, that is, Speaker A who says Never Mind after getting no response.

    So if Speaker A originally wants Speaker B to help, can Speaker B say "Never mind" since the situation has been sorted out before he acts?

    Just want to confirm!

    Thanks anyway!

    Jason

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    What happens in the original example is this:

    Speaker A - There is a cat stuck in a tree. Please get a ladder.
    Person B - (does not have time to reply before ...)
    Speaker A - Oh, it's OK. The cat is not in the tree any more. You don't need to get a ladder. ( = Never mind)

    If Person B had spotted the cat getting down from the tree, he/she would have said something like "The cat is no longer in the tree so I won't bother getting the ladder. It's no longer required". However, it was Person A who both asked for the ladder and, very shortly afterwards, realised that it was no longer needed so said "Never mind".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  10. #10
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: How to answer this?

    It would be the person who made the request who says "never mind." So you're right -- "never mind" is an odd thing for the second person to say. It's a poor question. You could argue that "No problem" works because he's saying "No problem remains" or "There's no longer any problem."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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