Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    KEN JPN is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    81
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default "will" vs "be going to" in an if-clause

    Hi, I'd like to know the difference between:

    (1) If you'
    re late for the meeting, please call me.
    (2) If you'
    ll be late for the meeting, please call me.
    (3) If you'
    re going to be late for the meeting, please call me.

    All these sentences are correct, but the meaning is different.
    In my understanding:

    (1) means "When you are already late, please call me."
    If I call someone if/when I am already late, it is too late.
    Maybe this is used when I have to call someone to report the fact that I was late for the meeting.

    (2) means "If you think/notice that you will not be able to be in time for the meeting, please let me know in advance."

    Then, what is the difference from (3)??

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,019
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "will" vs "be going to" in an if-clause

    (Not a Teacher)

    Your assessments are accurate for the first two sentences. The third sentence implies that you weren't anticipating being late and something happened or came up short notice that caused a delay. Basically, she's saying if, for instance, you get into a wreck on the way to the meeting, you should make sure to call her and let her know.

  3. #3
    KEN JPN is offline Junior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    81
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "will" vs "be going to" in an if-clause

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickVic9000 View Post
    (Not a Teacher)

    Your assessments are accurate for the first two sentences. The third sentence implies that you weren't anticipating being late and something happened or came up short notice that caused a delay. Basically, she's saying if, for instance, you get into a wreck on the way to the meeting, you should make sure to call her and let her know.
    Thank you very much for your comment again.

    Let me confirm my understanding here again.

    (a) It will rain tomorrow.
    (b) It
    is going to rain tomorrow.

    Simple Future Tense will in Sentence (a):
    This shows that when tomorrow comes, it will rain.
    As the time flows, a certain future will automatically come.
    The speaker might think so after watching a weather forecast on TV or weather report on a newspaper.

    "Be going to" in Sentence (b):
    The speaker judges from some circumstance or how things are going on, like "The sky is dark. No stars can be seen. The humidity is going up. So, judging from those circumstances, the weather seems to be rainy tomorrow. Things are on the way to a rainy day"

    So,
    "If you'll be late, call me"
    can be used, for example, when I am on the train to attend a meeting.
    It is 9:45AM now, and the meeting will start at 10:00AM.
    I know it takes 30 minutes for this train to reach the destination.
    So, I will automatically be late as the time flows. I have to inform that I will be late for the meeting.

    "If you're going to be late, call me"
    can be natural to use, when I am driving a car on the way to the meeting, it is 9:30AM and the meeting will start at 10:00AM, I know it usually takes only 15 minutes to my company if only there is no traffic. However, I happened to be in an accidental traffic jam due to a car accident. I am not sure if I can be in time for the meeting. It might take more than 30 minutes judging from the traffic. So, I have to call to inform with the possibility of my arriving late.

    Correct?

Similar Threads

  1. Defining "Street," "Road," "Avenue," "Boulevard"
    By ahumphreys in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 31-Dec-2010, 07:14
  2. [Vocabulary] Difference between "health" and "wellness", "Diagnosis" and "Analysis"
    By tobysky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2010, 22:43
  3. [Vocabulary] How do you pronounce "Cotton", "Button", "Britain", "Manhattan"...
    By Williamyh in forum Pronunciation and Phonetics
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Dec-2009, 08:36
  4. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 08-Sep-2008, 08:27
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •