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Thread: blue nose

  1. #1
    peppy_man is offline Member
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    blue nose

    I've heard that 'blue nose' means 'protestants' or 'puritans'.
    Is there anyone who knows why they are called that way?
    What is the origin of the word? Thank you.

  2. #2
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: blue nose

    Here you go:
    In the 1800's, Blue referred to strict religious conviction, and as an example, using casual language, a "Blue Nose" was a person with such convictions.
    http://www.celebrateboston.com/galle...nblueblood.htm

  3. #3
    peppy_man is offline Member
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    Re: blue nose

    tdol, thank you for the intresting link.
    It's very interesting that "blue" meant strict religious conviction.
    I wonder christians wear blue clothes in special occasions.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: blue nose

    The puritans wore dark colours- black, brown and dark blue. I think it's not meant in a nice way.

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    Talking Re: blue nose

    In the USA, in the past (not so much today, but still a bit), there were laws that prohibited certain businesses from being open on a Sunday. (Some stores, like pharmacies that sold "essential" goods, might be exempt. And some more general stores could open, but could not sell "non-essential merchandise," which the merchants would often cover up with large tarps to signal that those goods were not for sale...)

    These laws are called "Blue Laws."

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: blue nose

    We had some weird laws in the UK- you couldn't sell a Bible on a Sunday and could sell razors but not shaving cream, or the other way round, but not a complete shave.

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    Talking Re: blue nose

    In some US States, merchants can't sell alcoholic beverages on Sunday. Typically, you can get them on Sunday in a bar or restaurant, by the drink, just not in a retail store. You can imagine who's behind that law!!

    Hilarious about the Bible though....

    PS In the South, you may not be able to buy booze on Sunday, but you can buy a gun any day !!

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