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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    The answer for (c) can be "as if" or "like", but the answer is only "as if", which I doubt. What do you think?

    ex) According to field researchers, chimpanzees eat some plants for⒜[medicinal / medical] purposes. Chimps occasionally eat Aspilia, which is not part of chimps’ usual diet ⒝[because / because of] its leaves are rough, sharp and extremely nasty to eat. They usually eat it first thing in the morning and in a very different way than normal food. They do not chew the leaves, but roll them around in their mouth before swallowing. It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old­fashioned medicine. Some African people use Aspilia to relieve stomach complaints or remove intestinal worms. It also has antibiotic properties. It is thought that chimps use Aspilia for the same purposes.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    NOT A TEACHER

    When to Use Like, When to Use As
    The proper way to differentiate between like and as is to use like when no verb follows (2). For example, Squiggly throws like a raccoon or It acted just like my computer. Notice that when I use like, the words that come after are generally simple. A raccoon and my computer are the objects of the preposition.

    If the clause that comes next includes a verb, then you should use as. For example, Squiggly throws as if he were a raccoon or It acted just as I would expect my computer to behave. Notice that when I use as, the words that come after tend to be more complex.

    You generally hear like used in everyday speech, so that helps me remember that like is the simpler word—or at least it is followed by simpler words. As sounds stuffier and is followed by a more complex clause that contains a verb.

    Grammar Girl : Like Versus As :: Quick and Dirty Tips ™
    If you apply the above to your sentence, then it follows that "as if" is the correct answer.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    But I've heard and seen "It looks like it's going to rain".

  4. #4
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    But I've heard and seen "It looks like it's going to rain".
    But that doesn't mean that it's "correct". Take a look at what Grammar Girl has to say about that:

    The Like Versus As Controversy
    Whether you abide by this rule or not probably depends on how much of a grammar stickler you are. It's common to hear sentences like this: It's like I'm sitting at my own computer. And as a result, many people don't know it's wrong. In one survey, 21 percent of professional writers and editors said they found such constructions acceptable in casual speech. On the other hand, only 6 percent thought the construction would be OK in formal writing (3).

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    I would probably say "it looks like it's going to rain." I'm not sure that the rules about "as if" versus "like" are followed very closely by most natives in normal use.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    I don't always find grammar girl' articles helpful, but in that article she seems to give a pretty balanced picture of feelings about 'like' and 'as if'.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    I have no idea which to follow in this case. The statistics says it's wrong, so I feel like a minority in this rule.
    I definitely know "like" is a preposition that should be followed by noun forms(noun/pronoun/gerund), but I've got too used to this exceptional case of "It's like it's ...". so I'm all confused.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I have no idea which to follow in this case. The statistics says it's wrong, so I feel like a minority in this rule.
    I definitely know "like" is a preposition that should be followed by noun forms(noun/pronoun/gerund), but I've got too used to this exceptional case of "It's like it's ...". so I'm all confused.
    There are some things that native speakers don't agree about, that's all. If you want to be considered by some people as someone who speaks good English, don't say "It looks like it's going to rain". However, don't be surprised if you hear that said by many people. Most of us don't worry about what some experts say about some things.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: It looks just ⒞[as if / like] they are taking old*fashioned

    Hello.
    They look like test questions.

    Well (if I dealt with these questions in my class), as for (c), I would tell my students to choose "as if".
    I agree with you on the usage of "like" as a preposition. "The word "like", when used as a preposition, should be followed by noun forms(noun/pronoun/gerund) and not a clause." is exactly what I would say to support my idea.
    However, I would also tell them that "like" is possible. look - Definition and pronunciation | Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary at OxfordLearnersDictionaries.com

    In any case, I doubt if (c) is a good question.

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