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Thread: teacher to?

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    #11
    To and For don't work in that context at all, IMO.

  1. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #12
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I am a Spanish teacher of adults. That probably means the nationality not the subject.
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Isn't "I am a teacher of adults" okay? What about "I am an ESL teacher of adults"? Then there is "I am an English teacher of adults", which means the person teaches English to adults. I do not think under the context that English identifies the person's nationality. Instead, it identifies the subject that person teaches. What do you think?
    It's the old

    "She's a Spanish, English teacher." (She's Spanish and teaches English)
    "She's a British, Spanish teacher." (She's British and teaches Spanish)

    I'm an American, Spanish teacher of adults = I'm an American, adults' Spanish teacher. (Spanish = subject)

    :D

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    #13
    But not 'She's a Spanish British teacher'.

  2. RonBee's Avatar
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    #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    I am a Spanish teacher of adults. That probably means the nationality not the subject.
    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee
    Isn't "I am a teacher of adults" okay? What about "I am an ESL teacher of adults"? Then there is "I am an English teacher of adults", which means the person teaches English to adults. I do not think under the context that English identifies the person's nationality. Instead, it identifies the subject that person teaches. What do you think?
    It's the old

    "She's a Spanish, English teacher." (She's Spanish and teaches English)
    "She's a British, Spanish teacher." (She's British and teaches Spanish)

    I'm an American, Spanish teacher of adults = I'm an American, adults' Spanish teacher. (Spanish = subject)

    :D
    My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:

    English Idioms
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1697

    Brief Verse (Couplets)
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=1579

    :D

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    #15
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    But not 'She's a Spanish British teacher'.
    Hmm. Why not?

    She's a Spanish, British Literature teacher. :wink: :wink:

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

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    #16
    • My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:


    You mean, she was a Hamburger? :wink: :wink:

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    #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    But not 'She's a Spanish British teacher'.
    Hmm. Why not?

    She's a Spanish, British Literature teacher. :wink: :wink:
    That's cheating- you can study British Literature, but I've never seen a course in 'British'.

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    #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    • My German teacher was a German German teacher. (She originally came from Hamburg, I think.) :wink:


    You mean, she was a Hamburger? :wink: :wink:
    Yes, possibly.

    :wink:

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