Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    eggcracker's Avatar
    eggcracker is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    269
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    I think it's more easier for me to pronounce "slurp from", biting at the 'p' because of each similar sound 'p', 'f', though it can be only 'f' sound lacks the 'p' if I mispronounce it.
    I can pronounce 'p' in the 'slurp from' like the 'p' sound in the 'cup', 'yup', 'gulp' (I distinguish 'l' and 'r' sound but can't think up the words including 'urp' other than 'slurp') And I think biting my bottom lip at the alphabet 'p' makes me more easier to pronouncing the next word 'from'. My mouth position almost becomes same when pronouncing alphabet 'b', 'p', but I know two alphabet's sound are different.
    If I don't make any 'f' sound at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from" is it okay to bite my bottom lip when pronouncing 'slurp from'? And should I entirely close my mouth at the 'p' in the "slurp from'? I close my mouth at the 'p' in the "slurp from' for the pronounciation, but there's very narrow gap which can not be easily noticed except for me.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    The teeth are not involved in the bilabial (two lips) /p/ sound. In 'slurp from', your lower lip should move back from the /p/ position to make contact with your upper front teeth for the /f/. You cannot produce a /p/ sound by biting your lip. You can produce a /f/ sound in this way, but it's not necessary to do this. If there is a gap between your lips when you are trying to produce a /p/ then you are not producing a /p/.

    Note that the /p/ is not fully released when you say 'slurp from', so you will not hear/feel the aspiration (release of air) you would if you said 'slurping'.

  3. #3
    eggcracker's Avatar
    eggcracker is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    269
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    Thank you 5jj. Then, is it okay if I don't bite my lower lip and just slightly move my lower lip to my upper front teeth after /p/, and then back to the position when I pronounce /f/ sound?

  4. #4
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    Thank you 5jj. Then, is it okay if I don't bite my lower lip and just slightly move my lower lip to my upper front teeth after /p/, and then back to the position when I pronounce /f/ sound?
    It's not a matter of being 'OK', in the sense of 'acceptable'. It's a question of what you need to do if you want to produce the sounds a native speaker does.

  5. #5
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Japan
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,599
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    I have just tried biting my lower lip and it works, but it has nothing to do with the biting. I'd say that if it helps you produce the sound, it's OK, but I'd use it as a stepping stone for a more natural way or producing the sound.

  6. #6
    eggcracker's Avatar
    eggcracker is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    269
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    I've recently found 'assimilation' in pronunciation from BBC Learning English.

    So, I think it would be okay to pronounce 'Slurp from' like this:
    He takes a slurp from a cup of black coffee. (slurf from)



    Sounds change (assimilation) When a sound at the end of a word takes on the quality of the sound at the beginning of the next word.
    Good girl. She's a good girl. (goog girl)
    Good boy. He's a good boy. (goob boy)
    White paper. I only use white paper. (whipe paper)
    Speed boat. I've never been in speed boat. (speeb boat)BBC Learning English | Pronunciation Tips

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Is it okay to bite bottom lip at the 'p' when I pronouncing "slurp from"?

    Quote Originally Posted by eggcracker View Post
    So, I think it would be okay to pronounce 'Slurp from' like this:
    He takes a slurp from a cup of black coffee. (slurf from)
    That would be unnatural. The /p/ may not be fully exploded, but native speakers close the lips for the /p/ and then move the lower lip back to touch the upper front teeth for the /f/. If the lips are not closed for the /p/, we would hear the unnatural-sounding 'slur from' or 'slurfrom'.

    In the assimilations you mention, there is a stop - /g/, /b/, /p/. There needs to be a stop in 'slurp from' and it needs to be /p/.

Similar Threads

  1. "lip service" / "cause"
    By fadysandy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 09-Nov-2010, 09:50
  2. Origin of the idiom "bite off more than you can chew"
    By johnsononwallis in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 06-Sep-2007, 15:45
  3. Bite my lip
    By Cynthia91 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-Jun-2006, 18:44
  4. Understand"His bark is worse than his bite."
    By hellohan06 in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Jun-2006, 06:10
  5. ?"frog-pond" and " put the bottom rail on top
    By japanjapan in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Apr-2004, 15:32

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •