Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    learning54's Avatar
    learning54 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Spain
      • Current Location:
      • Spain
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Question on 'run over'

    Hi teachers,
    Would 'b' be a good explanation for 'a'. If not, could you suggest me one please?
    A couple of weeks ago, he almost ran over an old lady.

    A couple of weeks ago, he almost collided with his vehicle an old lady.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    14,796
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Question on 'run over'

    '. . . he almost knocked down an old lady (with his car).'

  3. #3
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,342
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Question on 'run over'

    I don't know if other dialects of English use the phrasal verb "run over" to mean "deliver something or someone via a quick trip" as in "Could you run these over to Mr. Smith?" or "I need to run these muffins over to the bake sale."

    It can be a little funny sounding when I say something like "Do you I need to run you over?" meaning "take you quickly someplace that we were just talking about" because it sounds like I plan to drive over their body with my vehicle and not serve as their means of transportation.

    Anyway, don't be shocked if you hear someone say "I just need to run Sally over..." They don't have vehicular homicide in mind.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. #4
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Philippines
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    43,263
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Question on 'run over'

    Quote Originally Posted by learning54 View Post
    A couple of weeks ago, he almost collided with his vehicle an old lady.
    This doesn't work. Another possibility would be ...he almost hit an old lady with his car.

Similar Threads

  1. [General] 'run out of something' versus 'run short of something'
    By JarekSteliga in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 22-Apr-2012, 13:00
  2. [General] in the long run/ in the short run
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Nov-2010, 18:33
  3. [General] hoist/run up/waste/run through/
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Mar-2010, 14:04
  4. [Grammar] In the longer run or In the long run
    By anupumh in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2009, 19:55
  5. run low/run short
    By aaa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 22-Jun-2005, 17:05

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •