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  1. #1
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    Default please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner.

    1. I don't get "please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner." Does it mean "if you are perfectly well-behaved at home, you don't have to care about your behavior"?
    2.Does this "while" mean "at the same time" or "on the other hand"?
    3.Which does this "their" refer to? "natural respect and affection" or "each member of the family"? I think it's the former, but the translation goes the latter.

    330-33
    ex)...Do not fall into the absurd error of supposing that you may do as you please at home - that is, unless you please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner. The same rights exist there as elsewhere, and the same duties grow out of them, while the natural respect and affection which should be felt by each member of the family for all the other members, add infinitely to their sacredness. Let your good manners, then, begin at home.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    1. I don't get "please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner." Does it mean "if you are perfectly well-behaved at home, you don't have to care about your behavior"?
    2.Does this "while" mean "at the same time" or "on the other hand"?
    3.Which does this "their" refer to? "natural respect and affection" or "each member of the family"? I think it's the former, but the translation goes the latter.

    330-33
    ex)...Do not fall into the absurd error of supposing that you may do as you please at home - that is, unless you please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner. The same rights exist there as elsewhere, and the same duties grow out of them, while the natural respect and affection which should be felt by each member of the family for all the other members, add infinitely to their sacredness. Let your good manners, then, begin at home.
    Hello, keannu.
    OK...let me try.

    As for #1, I think "please" here is similar in meaning to "like". ( "to behave...' is the object of the verb 'please', I reckon. I'm not used to this usage, actually.) And "unless" is, as you know, is similar in meaning to "if...not".
    So, if I rewrite that part, it goes like this:
    "Do not have the absurdly wrong idea that you can do as you like/whatever you want at home, if you don't like to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner."

    As for #2, both work in my opinion.

    As for #3, let's think about how something/somebody becomes sacred. If you have a great respect and affection for something/somebody, it (s/he) will eventually become sacred, right? If you are a religious person, I think you'll understand what I mean. Therefore I'd go for the latter - "each member of the family"

    My interpretation might be wrong.
    Please wait for other teachers to reply.

  3. #3
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: please to behave in a perfectly gentlemanly or ladylike manner.

    I have no idea if this is a modern one or a medieval(ancient) one. And you and Barb_D indicated this is an old one. On what evidence do you feel so? Can you tell me the words or phrases that seem quite antique? Like "please to behave "? It doesn't seem to be a modern one.
    *The thing is they designated a mandatory workbook for university entrance exam, and they will pick out any question randomly from numerous questions of the book, that's why students have to study all the questions.

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