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  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #11

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by Natalie1991 View Post
    As a native speaker, I would not say it that way....

    Ling's mother said her daughter won a scholarship to attend a six month....

    Please do not correct my grammar. This is how a natve would say it, writing it is different. I think it is okay how you have it now. You can also replace has with had.
    As 5jj said, we are all open to having anything we choose to post questioned and, if necessary, corrected. See above.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #12

    Re: check for errors

    @Natalie, please read this extract from the forum's Posting Guidelines:

    You are welcome to answer questions posted in the Ask a Teacher forum as long as your suggestions, help, and advice reflect a good understanding of the English language. If you are not a teacher, you will need to state that clearly at the top of your post.

    Rover

  2. keannu's Avatar
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    #13

    Re: check for errors

    Okay, I forgot the exceptional cases behind strict grammar rules. I remember learning valuable exceptional rules like these from here, but they were present progressive and present tense, not present perfect, but now I learned one more.

    1. The professor said he is still preparing for the lecture. (His preparation is still not finished even now)
    2. He was very proud that he is American. (His identity is present tense, everlasting)

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    #14

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Okay, I forgot the exceptional cases behind strict grammar rules. I remember learning valuable exceptional rules like these from here, but they were present progressive and present tense, not present perfect, but now I learned one more.

    1. The professor said he is still preparing for the lecture. (His preparation is still not finished even now)
    2. He was very proud that he is American. (His identity is present tense, everlasting)
    Note that this is a contentious issue. There are people who say it's never correct to use tenses this way. They are a minority though, as far as I can tell.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #15

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Okay, I forgot the exceptional cases behind strict grammar rules. I remember learning valuable exceptional rules like these from here, but they were present progressive and present tense, not present perfect, but now I learned one more.
    If 'strict grammar rules' have too many exceptions, then they have no value as rules.

    I hear and see far too often 'rules' such as: When reported speech is introduced by a reporting verb in a past tense, all tenses in the original utterance must be backshifted.

    That has never been anything but a gross over-simplification. If one is going to attempt to summarise the situation in one
    sentence, it needs to be something like:

    If a situation noted in direct speech is still current, then the verb tenses in a reported speech version introduced by a reporting verb in a past tense may, but do not have to be, backshifted; if the situation noted is no longer current, then the tenses are backshifted.

    Even that does not tell the whole story, but it is rather closer to the truth than the version so often found.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #16

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by birdeen's call View Post
    Note that this is a contentious issue. There are people who say it's never correct to use tenses this way.
    I don't think there is any contention among grammarians.

    Somebody is bound to prove me wrong now.

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    #17

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I don't think there is any contention among grammarians.
    I don't know, but I remember some users here.

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    #18

    Re: check for errors

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    Hello.
    I know what you mean, but if it (winning the scholarship) has the 'present reality', I think the Present Perfect is possible.
    I agree with both your points.

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