Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Sllip Jail

  1. #1
    WideLeft is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Albanian
      • Home Country:
      • Antigua
      • Current Location:
      • Anguilla
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Post Sllip Jail

    If a dog could slip its leash, could I write:

    "An inmate slipped the jail cell."
    "An inmate slipped jail."

    ?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is online now Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    22,450
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sllip Jail

    No. An inmate simply "escapes from" his cell. He might "slip out" through the bars, or through a cell door which was accidentally left open.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    WideLeft is offline Banned
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Albanian
      • Home Country:
      • Antigua
      • Current Location:
      • Anguilla
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    3
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sllip Jail

    news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1955&dat=19620723&id=IBMrAAAAIBAJ&s jid=fZwFAAAAIBAJ&pg=4333,2537708

    "6 German Prisoners Slip Jail, Pull Jobs"

    So, it is wrong in this newspaper?

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    15,473
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: Sllip Jail

    Yes and no. Newspapers - with their narrow column-width - tend to adopt and adapt short words: 'slip' rather than 'escape from', 'pull' rather than 'be accepted for' (if that's what it means in this context - ah no, on second thoughts it probably means 'commit crimes'*), 'probe', 'leak', 'quest', 'grill' (in the sense 'interrogate')... etc. etc. These words are understood in that context.

    b

    *This sort of ambiguity is the sort of thing that newspapers regard as a risk worth taking.
    Last edited by BobK; 16-Jul-2012 at 11:22. Reason: Added PS

Similar Threads

  1. Going to jail "for a yard"??
    By mrghd in forum English Slang
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 19-Jun-2012, 02:54
  2. nine months/months' jail
    By Tan Elaine in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Apr-2012, 18:44
  3. be clear--for jail visitation
    By IQU3838 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-Dec-2010, 06:14
  4. [General] few crumbs of comfort / repaired to jail
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2008, 15:58
  5. jail or prison
    By zoobinshid in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Jul-2005, 22:11

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Hotchalk