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    #1

    p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Hi All,

    When we pronounce "Speak", Stamp", "Sky, can we sound the p, t, and k aspirated after "s" ?

    EngFan
    Last edited by EngFan; 17-Jul-2012 at 03:00.

  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Not a teacher, but a fellow learner

    I don't understand what you mean by "aspirate", but I surely know that "p", "t", and "k" after "s", change into tense consonants. Those sound different from their normal sounds.

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    #3

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Quote Originally Posted by EngFan View Post
    Hi All,

    When we pronounce "Speak", Stamp", "Sky, can we sound the p, t, and k aspirated after "s" ?

    EngFan
    No, you don't aspirate those unvoiced plosives after an /s/.

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    #4

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Not a teacher, but a fellow learner

    I don't understand what you mean by "aspirate", but I surely know that "p", "t", and "k" after "s", change into tense consonants. Those sound different from their normal sounds.
    The tenseness of a sound is a very vague notion. It describes different phenomena in different languages. What aspiration is, on the other hand, is quite clear. You can learn what the word means from this page.

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    #5

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    I was wondering if any native speakers would aspirate those unvoiced plosives after an /s/? I hear some non-native speakers sometimes would aspirate those unvoiced plosives after an /s/, as you are native speaker, would you consider this is a wrong way in pronunciation?

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    #6

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Quote Originally Posted by EngFan View Post
    I was wondering if any native speakers would aspirate those unvoiced plosives after an /s/? I hear some non-native speakers sometimes would aspirate those unvoiced plosives after an /s/, as you are native speaker, would you consider this is a wrong way in pronunciation?
    I doubt if a native speaker could; you learn not to in the course of becoming a native speaker. (I would find it very difficult to do; and while I can hear something odd when others do it, my ability to identify it lasted only a year or two.*)

    To see the effect of aspiration (a little puff of air) hold a piece of tissue in front of your mouth and see what happens when you say 'pin' as opposed to what happens when you say 'spin'

    b

    PS * In another thread I mentioned Audrey Hepburn - who because of her Dutch roots had some sort of strange behaviour about aspirating her voiceless stops. Most people think her voice has a certain je ne sais quoi, but not many would say she had a foreign accent.

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    #7

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I doubt if a native speaker could; you learn not to in the course of becoming a native speaker. (I would find it very difficult to do; and while I can hear something odd when others do it, my ability to identify it lasted only a year or two.*)

    To see the effect of aspiration (a little puff of air) hold a piece of tissue in front of your mouth and see what happens when you say 'pin' as opposed to what happens when you say 'spin'

    b

    PS * In another thread I mentioned Audrey Hepburn - who because of her Dutch roots had some sort of strange behaviour about aspirating her voiceless stops. Most people think her voice has a certain je ne sais quoi, but not many would say she had a foreign accent.
    As you are native speaker, would you consider people say Speak, Spoon, Discover, Straw, Skin are same as to say Sbeak, Sboon, Disgover, Sdraw, Sgin?

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    #8

    Re: p, t, and k are not aspirated??

    If native speakers were to produce the non-words Sbeak, Sboon, Sdraw, Sgin, they would sound like Speak, Spoon, Straw, Skin. Disgover might well be uttered with a /g/ sound, as there might be a marginal break affter 'dis', perceived as a prefix.

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