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  1. #1
    Aidan's Avatar
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    Question Coming and going.

    I cant come to class next week because Im coming back to France for a week

    My understanding is that you could say:

    I can't go because I'm coming.
    I can't go because I'm going.
    I can't come because I'm going.
    But you couldn't say I can't come because I'm coming.

    Can anyone explain the rule that defines why this is?

    My guess is that The verb come can reference only one noun in any given sentence. In the above sentence it is trying to reference two different nouns?

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    “I can’t come to class next week because I’m coming back to France for a week”

    My understanding is that you could say:

    I can't go because I'm coming.
    I can't go because I'm going.
    I can't come because I'm going.
    But you couldn't say I can't come because I'm coming.

    Can anyone explain the rule that defines why this is?

    My guess is that The verb come can reference only one noun in any given sentence. In the above sentence it is trying to reference two different nouns?
    If you are French and in England, for example, it would be correct to say "I am going back to France" to somebody in England. You could say "I'm coming back to France" to somebody in France. (This last wouldn't work in the context of your sentence.)

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    “I can’t come to class next week because I’m coming back to France for a week”

    My understanding is that you could say:

    I can't go because I'm coming.
    I can't go because I'm going.
    I can't come because I'm going.
    But you couldn't say I can't come because I'm coming.

    Can anyone explain the rule that defines why this is?

    My guess is that The verb come can reference only one noun in any given sentence. In the above sentence it is trying to reference two different nouns?
    Am I right that this sentence is spoken while you are in England (where you study) and before you leave? If so, then:

    I can't come to class next week because I'm going back to France for a week.


    Once you are in France, you would say:

    I couldn't go to class this week because I was coming here for a week.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    Aidan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Thanks for the reply Emsr2d2. In your example are you sure that "I couldn't go to class this week because I was coming here for a week." is correct?

    Wouldn't it be better to say "I couldn't go to class this week because I came here for a week."?

    Because, if you are in France the action 'to come' has already taken place in the past and is not in the continuous tense as indicated by 'was coming'? I'm not sure about this one can anyone help to clarify it for me?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    ... are you sure that "I couldn't go to class this week because I was coming here for a week." is correct?
    It is correct, or ems would not have written it.

    It conveys the meaning of, "... because I had arranged to come here for a week".
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aidan View Post
    Thanks for the reply Emsr2d2. In your example are you sure that "I couldn't go to class this week because I was coming here for a week." is correct?

    Wouldn't it be better to say "I couldn't go to class this week because I came here for a week."?

    Because, if you are in France the action 'to come' has already taken place in the past and is not in the continuous tense as indicated by 'was coming'? I'm not sure about this one can anyone help to clarify it for me?
    Yes I'm sure it's correct!

    As 5jj (sorry!) said, the statement refers back to plans you had made which meant you couldn't go to class. There are, of course, other things you could say in that situation (once you are in France):

    - I should be at my English class in London today but I'm not there because I'm here!
    - I should have gone to class this week here but I came here instead.
    - Because I decided to come here on holiday, I didn't/couldn't go to my class this week.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 19-Jul-2012 at 10:51. Reason: Oops, mixed up 2 fantastic guys again!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #7
    tzfujimino's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Yes I'm sure it's correct!

    As 5jj said, the statement refers back to plans you had made which meant you couldn't go to class. There are, of course, other things you could say in that situation (once you are in France):
    It's 5jj, ems!

    Last edited by tzfujimino; 19-Jul-2012 at 12:40.

  8. #8
    FreeZiebel is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    I'll assume that you are from France, and that your school is in the USA.

    Imagine that you are currently near your school in the USA, but plan to go to back to France for a week next week.

    Imagine also that your teacher is originally from France, is currently visiting family in France, but will be back in the USA for your class next week.

    If you speak to your teacher over the telephone, your teacher may ask you,

    Are you coming to class next week?
    to which you could correctly reply,

    I can't come to class next week because I am coming back to France for a week.
    Each of the different formulations can make sense in the correct context. This still sounds clumsy though. Better to vary the verb.

    Not a professional teacher...

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Quote Originally Posted by tzfujimino View Post
    It's 5jj, ems!

    Thank you! Edited.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  10. #10
    Aidan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Coming and going.

    Thanks for all the help with this one. So, strictly speaking, there is no grammatical rule which disallows: "I can't come to class next week because I am coming back to France for a week."?

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