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  1. #11
    keannu's Avatar
    keannu is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    What do you think is the function of "a" here? A note for "belonging to a group" or something? I still can't get it as there is only one Tennessee accent which is unique.

    ex) He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

  2. #12
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I read the link, and it seems to be saying "accent" is more like pronunciation variation, while "dialect" is more like vocabulary difference, but the distinction is kind of vague. Does it go like this?

    1. We have different verb-endings in each region in Korea, some province says "-yo", some "-yoo", some "ye", etc
    We call them dialects, but are they accents in English? For example, caught is pronounced as "kɑ:t" in California, but as "kɔ:t" in New York. Are these accents?

    2.If they use jub(made-up one by me) is used in Florida, for cot(a baby bed), a totally different word, then is it a dialect?
    1. Well, it is kind of vague. It's sometimes difficult to say whether something is a different pronunciation of the same word or morpheme, or a different word or morpheme. The dialects of English in California and in New York are very similar in terms of vocabulary. But it's complicated. There are Californians (but also many people outside California), for example, who speak the so-called Valleyspeak. It has a distinctive vocabulary. Californians often pronounce things differently from New Yorkers, but neither of the accents is homogenous. There are plenty of social factors which can make neighbors speak with different accents.

    2. Yes, that's the kind of thing dialects often differ in.

    The word "dialect" has a broader scope.
    Last edited by birdeen's call; 25-Jul-2012 at 14:02.

  3. #13
    keannu's Avatar
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    I've always wondered if you are a native speaker from the UK or Polish.

  4. #14
    birdeen's call is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I've always wondered if you are a native speaker from the UK or Polish.
    I'm Polish. English is my second language.

  5. #15
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    Yes, pronunciation is "accent" while vocabulary is more "dialect."

    Whether you call Coca Cola "soda" or "pop" is dialect. How you say "soda" is accent.

  6. #16
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: He speaks with a Tennessee accent.

    A personal note. I consider major dialect/accent groups such as American English (which I would prefer to call US English - Canadian English is different), what is generally known as British English (which would perhaps be better named Standard Southern English English), Scottish English, Irish English etc to be varieties of English. Within each variety there many be many dialects and sub-dialects.

    Varieties/dialects differ from each other in any or all of lexis, grammar, pronunciation of phonemes, intonation, etc.

    People who speak using the same grammar and lexis, but pronounce one or more of the phonemes in a different way, and/or use different stress/intonation patterns have different accents.

    Informally, many people use the word accent when phoneticians would use dialect/variety.

    Note that some dialects/varieties have phonemes that do not exist in other dialects/varieies, for example the sounds in Scottish loch, Irish lough, Welsh Llanelli.

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