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    #1

    You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    I heard many native speakers said the following phrases leaving out ‘the verb to be’ and ‘articles’.

    1. You lazy bones (You're a lazy bones)
    2. You idiot (You're an idiot)

    I don’t know how to explain to my child. Could anybody explain to me, please?

    Is it common for native speakers to say ‘e.g you jerk instead of you are a jerk?

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 31-Jul-2012 at 16:20.

  1. Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    NOT A TEACHER

    I have heard native speakers say things such as, 'You idiot', so, yes, I guess it's pretty common in spoken English. There is an implied verb, 'You (are an) idiot'.

    You cannot, however, say, 'He/she idiot' (although I can't say why). You also cannot say, 'You smart'. 'You genius' does work on the other hand.
    Last edited by Chicken Sandwich; 31-Jul-2012 at 16:43.

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    #3

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken Sandwich View Post
    NOT A TEACHER

    I have heard native speakers say things such as, 'You idiot', so, yes, I guess it's pretty common in spoken English. There is an implied verb, 'You (are an) idiot'.

    You cannot, however, say, 'He/she idiot' (although I can't say why). You also cannot say, 'You smart'. 'You genius' does work on the other hand.
    Thanks, Chicken Sandwich.

    What does "implied verb" mean? I wonder if it is common to say 'you stupid' (When parents talks to their children)?

    Thanks again!

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    I wonder if it is common to say 'you stupid' (When parents talks to their children)?
    No. Parents who wish to speak to their children in such terms might say, "You stupid boy/girl", but not just "You stupid".

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks, Chicken Sandwich.

    What does "implied verb" mean? I wonder if it is common to say 'you stupid' (When parents talks to their children)?

    Thanks again!
    No. The implication is in the context. If I look at you and say 'Dimwiit' the implication is 'You are a ...'. So to say you think someone's stupid, you just look at them and say 'Stupid. However, if a colleague and I are both complaing about a new HR proposal, I can say to him/her 'Stupid' and mean '[IT is] stupid.

    Finally, there is a possible explanation for the utterance 'You stupid [...]' - it could be 'You stupid idiot' or 'You stupid fool' or 'You stupid <any-noun>. Sometimes people start out to say 'You stupid...' and then can't think of a suitable noun. Often, they justify the [...] by saying something like 'You stupid... I can't think of a word that fits.'

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Thanks, Chicken Sandwich.

    What does "implied verb" mean? I wonder if it is common to say 'you stupid' (When parents talks to their children)?

    Thanks again!
    No. The implication is in the context. If I look at you and say 'Dimwiit' the implication is 'You are a ...'. So to say you think someone's stupid, you just look at them and say 'Stupid'. However, if a colleague and I are both complaining about a new HR proposal, I can say to him/her 'Stupid' and mean '[IT is] stupid.

    Finally, there is a possible explanation for the utterance 'You stupid [...]' - it could be 'You stupid idiot' or 'You stupid fool' or 'You stupid <any-noun>. Sometimes people start out to say 'You stupid...' and then can't think of a suitable noun. Often, they justify the [...] by saying something like 'You stupid... I can't think of a word that fits.'

    b

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    I just want to say that the question itself makes me sad. I would never, EVER say "You are stupid" to my children, or "You idiot!" as a way to address them.

    More to the point:
    The reason you can say "You genius!" but not "You smart" is that genius, lazy bones, smart ass, idiot, etc. are all nouns. I have seen many English learns say "He is a stupid" but that is wrong - "stupid" is only an adjective, not a noun.

    There are hundreds of things you you can say after "you" in this manner: You miracle worker, you! You prince! You clever boy! You naughty kitten! (Yes, I talk to my cats.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #8

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    (Yes, I talk to my cats.)
    They expect it and understand every word you say.

    Rover

  6. 5jj's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I talk to my cats.
    I talk to my wife's cat. When my wife is not at home I do tend to say, "You ******"

    Incidentally, this is a cat that is not the brightest of feline beasts. It has a surname, "Branez", and a forename "Sheetfer". At least, that's the way I have to spell and pronounce its name in a family forum.
    Last edited by 5jj; 31-Jul-2012 at 21:40. Reason: typ

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    #10

    Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Hi teachers,

    I heard some native speakers said something like "You hungry" in the moive, but I am not sure whether they were just saying "You're hungry".

    Thanks.
    Last edited by Winwin2011; 31-Jul-2012 at 21:01.

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