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  1. #21
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    However, as long as you stick to your own ice-cream and don't even look at mine...
    Is that pistachio with a hint of balsamic?

  2. #22
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    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Is that pistachio with a hint of balsamic?
    You are asking me? I did not choose the emoticons, so I'm not likely to know. However, if it b e pistachio, I might choose not to use it again, I don't like it at all
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. #23
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    +1 for Pistachio gelato.

    Back to the implied verb, I don't agree there necessarily is one. Think of the accusative case in Latin and Greek, which (sort of) lives on in our translations of the Classics... e.g. "O, Agamemnon!" or even "O, Canada".

    To me, "you fool" is something we might compare to an accusative case of the noun 'fool' -- without a verb.

    As for the initial question by the reader from HK, I'd explain it to my kid as follows.

    In Cantonese, you can call somebody a 'cute' insult either with an accusative type noun, or with a complete sentence, interchangeably:

    "Ham sap lo!" cf. "Lei hai ham sap lo!"
    or
    "Soo zai!" cf. "Lei hai soo zai!"

    [Sorry, my keyboard can't type Chinese at the moment]

  4. #24
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by charliedeut View Post
    .., if it b e pistachio, I might choose not to use it again, I don't like it at all
    I'm afraid you've been misled by si sea/si fuera. Even in the USA, where the subjunctive is much more widely used than it is here, I think most people would say 'If it's pistachio...'. In Br English it sounds either very formal, or hypercorrect or archaic. In fact, it's so archaic that it makes me think it collocates better with the (very archaic) alternative to 'if': 'an't be'!

    Meanwhile, back on topic...

    b

  5. #25
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    Hi teachers,

    I heard some native speakers said something like "You hungry" in the moive, but I am not sure whether they were just saying "You're hungry".

    Thanks.
    Probably as a question. "You hungry/thirsty/tired/happy etc.?"


  6. #26
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    charliedeut is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I'm afraid you've been misled by si sea fuese/si fuera.
    I know not whether you were misled or just thy memory failed thee.
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  7. #27
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: You lazy bones/You're a lazy bones

    Nope. C'est un flic blond - pure ignorance. Spanish isn't my strong point.

    b

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