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  1. #11
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: I take GREAT Offense to something posted on this site....

    Quote Originally Posted by KlubNES View Post
    ...nor have I ever heard this slang. If it's a common everyday thing for the Brits to refer to and use one of the Greatest American presidents of all time's name in such a way well, 'no comment'.

    ...
    I haven't heard ti either. It's not common, though apparently it's been recorded.

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  2. #12
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Re: I take GREAT Offense to something posted on this site....

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    A lower second class degree in England, a 2:2 (two two), was referred to at one time as a 'Desmond'.
    And a third class degree was a Richard.

    And while Hank Marvin wasn't notably deprived of food, there is an element of good-natured teasing in this expression, as he's far from well-covered.

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    Last edited by BobK; 14-Aug-2012 at 20:13. Reason: Fix link

  3. #13
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: I take GREAT Offense to something posted on this site....

    Quote Originally Posted by KlubNES View Post
    If it's a common everyday thing for the Brits to refer to and use one of the Greatest American presidents of all time's name in such a way well, 'no comment'.
    Cockney rhyming slang is something used in certain areas of London- most British people will not know this term, though some rhyming slang has become part of the wider language, like have a butcher's (meaning have a look, the rhyme being butcher's hook). In most areas of British life, President Lincoln would be treated with respect, but in one small area of slang his name has been used this way. Rhyming slang is irreverent and creative, and the drive of it is meant to be harmless. You can ask for a pint of Nelson (Nelson Mendela = Stella [Artois]) and it's not meant to be rude about another great politician, just cheeky.

    Rhyming slang is found in other variants like Australian English.

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