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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    Is it grave mistake to use singular V2B with plural noun? I don't believe that title since it breaks English Grammar rule.

    Is Our Children Learning Enough Grammar to Get Hired?

    Source: Is Our Children Learning Enough Grammar to Get Hired? - Room for Debate - NYTimes.com

  2. charliedeut's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    Hi,

    The headline is intended to introduce you to the discussion on the importance grammar is given. It was written like that on purpose; no mistake there.

    charliedeut
    Please be aware that I'm neither a native English speaker nor a teacher.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    In case it wasn't clear (I must admit when I saw charliedeut's words "No mistake there" for one awful minute I thought he was serious), the incorrect verb form has been used specifically to make the point that not learning good grammar as a child might be an issue for people when it comes to entering the workforce. It's not a pun. It's not a joke. It is simply making a point.

    So - to be clear - it is not acceptable to use "is" with "our children" in this way.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    I'm glad you asked the question, because I went on to read the article. I'm going to make sure ems knows about it - she has some thoughts she may or may not see echoed in the sentiments of the contributors.

    Edit: Geez. I took so long to finish posting (because I was reading) that I'm utterly late to the party.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 14-Aug-2012 at 13:58.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: Can "Is Our Children" make sense?

    NOT A TEACHER


    Hello, Ms. Dawn:

    May I add my two bits to the other posters' excellent answers?

    1. I believe that "is" was used in the headline to attract the attention of the readers. I think that it is accurate to

    assume that the readers of The New York Times are highly educated people. That headline must have made them

    chuckle to themselves and persuaded them to read the article.

    2. When I read that headline, I immediately thought of the title of a book that has amused many people.

    In the 19th century, a gentleman wanted to help people learn English. There was, however, a big problem:

    the gentleman himself did not really know English. So he called his book:

    English As She Is Spoke. The author was not trying to be funny or get people's attention -- as was, IMHO, the

    writer of The New York Times headline.


    HAVE A NICE DAY!

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